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Full text of "Report of the Board of Regents"

T<iLU\b 

Vol. 10 JANUARY, 1915 '•'■ No . 1 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
BULLETIN 







BIENNIAL REPORT 

1913-14 



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RESiUENT'S U^*^»Ck: 



Published by the University of Idaho 
Entered at the Post Office as Second Class Matter 



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III 



FIRST BIENNIAL REPORT 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

AND 

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

1913-H 






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CHAPTER III 
SPECIAL REPORTS 

SECTION I. THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
MOSCOW 



c— 1 



To the State Board of Education and Board of Regents of the University 
of Idaho: 
I have the honor to submit the following report of the University of 
Idaho for the biennium 1913-1914. 

MELVIN A. BRANNON, 

President. 



REPORT OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY 



During the past bieniiium there has been an entire change in the con- 
trol of University of Idaho. The Legislature enacted a law in the 1913 
session whereby all state-supported schools for higher education were 
placed under a single board of control. The last meeting of the former 
Board of Regents of the University of Idaho was held April 15-17, 1913. 
The present State Board of Education and Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity immediately took charge, the first University meeting being held 
at Moscow, June 10, 1913, 

In addition to the changed character and personnel of the Board of 
Regents, the University of Idaho has had three administrative officers 
during this biennium. 

In view of these changes it is impossible to make a closely co-ordinated 
biennial report of the University. One is limited to statements of general 
activities and confined to a conservative presentation of policies. 

One may say that the constructive work of his predecessors will oe 
carefully safeguarded and that the efforts of the administration will be 
directed toward making a better and then a bigger University whose 
educational, cultural and industrial service shall be for the entire State 
of Idaho. 

Assurance, moreover, may be given that every effort will be made to 
safeguard the quality of University service by using great care in select- 
ing adequately trained merhbers of the instructional and extension 
staff, — people who have evinced a personality characterized by devotion 
to worthy and loyal ideals, impatient with intrigue and indifferent 
service in educational and civic relations. In other words, it shall be our 
greatest endeavor to secure worthily trained people for the State of 
Idaho, — workers who will be more concerned with the problems of secur- 
ing the greatest possible returns for the investments made rather than 
anxious to spend all of the money appropriated for departmental needs. 

Associated with these ideals will be that of co-operating more closely 
with all of the educational workers in the state-supported institutions 
for higher education, and with the great army of city and rural school 
teachers in order that every man, woman and child within the borders 
of the commonwealth may receive large educational values. 

If these ideals are to be realized, it will be necessary for the University 
of Idaho to be a real University in spirit and in fact as well as in 
theory. Provision must be made whereby the best trained men and 
women may be employed and suitable equipment must be furnished that 
this staff of workers may engage in the two principal lines of service 
which are distinctly University in character. The first type of service 
is that of teaching, or dispensing knowledge. In order that this may 
be done adequately and properly, there must be sufficient emphasis 
placed upon the second kind of activity, namely, research. Unless these 
two kinds of University expression can be properly encouraged, the 



58 Biennial Report, 1913-U 

people of Idaho cannot have an efficient State University, None would 
deny that the fundamental subjects, vocational and cultural, should be 
taught in the most effective manner. It may not be so universally recog- 
nized that proper teaching cannot be done unless it is intimately asso- 
ciated with that other great fundamental expression of University life, — 
research thru which the bounds of knowledge are extended. The 
only way to get ahead is to move forward. Hence the only way to im- 
prove upon the present standards of life, to advance the present arts and 
industries in Idaho beyond the point which has already been attained 
is to make new discoveries and make provision for their utilization. 

The truth of these statements is being appreciated by other common- 
wealths, notably the states in the great middle west and northwest. 
The State University of Illinois and the State University of Wisconsin 
have received liberal support for the advancement of the investigations 
carried on by their research staff. The results that have been accom- 
plished are regarded by the people of the respective commonwealths as 
ample justification of the support accorded the graduate colleges in those 
Universities. 

Possibly the quotation taken from the report of the recent survey 
which was made on Research and Teaching in the University of Wis- 
consin may illustrate the viewpoint of the present administration in the 
University of Idaho: 

"Under existing conditions, the college or university which fails to 
provide for research work by its instructors is likely to have mediocre 
teaching. The better men tend to go to institutions where they will be 
encouraged to do research work and those who stay are apt to adopt 
the attitude of the schoolmaster rather than that of the professor. The 
university or college which does not regard the advancement of knowl- 
edge and public service as part of its functions has small claim to public 
support or private gifts, and is likely to deteriorate in all directions." 

It must be understood that emphasis is not to be placed upon theor- 
etical studies merely. Equal energy and great wisdom must be devoted 
to applying the truth which has been discovered by the university work- 
ers. It should be a part of our immediate plan to organize a strong 
University Extension Department whose work for the sane life of the 
towns, villages and cities of Idaho would be comparable to our present 
Agricultural Extension service which endeavors to meet the needs of 
those engaged in our immense agricultural industry. Only through 
extension service can correspondence courses, lectures, and various 
forms of high class entertainments, in small as well as larger social 
centers, be provided by the State University. 

FACULTY CHANGES. 

1913. 

Dr. James A. MacLean, for twelve years President of the University, 

accepted the Presidency of the University of Manitoba in November, 

1912. He asked that his resignation as President of the University of 

Idaho take effect January 31, 1913. 



University of Idaho 59 



Mr. W. L. Carlyle, Dean of the College of Agriculture, was elected 
Acting President on January 29, 1913. 

The following persons left the University Faculty at the close of the 
college year 1912-1913: 

Name. Title and Department. 

Hughes, J. A. (Jan. 1913) > . . . Principal, School of Practical Agri. 

McArthur, C. L Instructor, Bacteriology. 

Pratt, O. A Instructor, Botany. 

Franklin, Lieut. J. F Commandant of Cadets, Military Sci. 

Tull, C. C Assoc. Professor, English. 

Aldrich, J. M Professor, Biology. 

Collens, Mrs. S. S Instructor, English. 

Grardner, D. C Instructor, Forge Work. 

(Died Dec. 1912.) 

Schermerhorn, G Asst. Professor, Home Economics. 

McCutcheon, O. E Professor and Dean, Law. 

Wilber, C. H Assoc. Professor, Law. 

Maguire, J. F Professor, Music (ad interim.) 

Gurney, L Professor, Physics. 

Baker, E. T Professor, Veterinary Science. 

Collens, E. H Instructor, Violin Playing. 

New members of the Faculty replacing those who did not return m 
the autumn of 1913 were the following: 

Name. " Title and Department. 

Sdmundson, C. S Principal, School of Practical Agri. 

fulmer, H Instructor, Bacteriology. 

3-ail, F. W Asst. Professor, Botany. 

Fooks, Lieut. H. C L:)ommandant of Cadets, Military Sci. 

Brashear, M. M Asst. Professor, English. 

Hyde, Hallie Instructor, Home Economics. 

Leiby, C. Irene Instructor, Home Economics. 

Davis, Norma Instructor, Home Economics. 

Ayers, G. D Professor and Dean, Law. 

Gill, J. J Professor, Law. 

Angell, M. F Professor, Physics. 

Hahner, A. R Asst. Professor, Veterinary Science. 

Hughes, Mrs. M. F Instructor, Violin Playing. 

Leave of absence during the year 1913-1914: 

Tones, J. S Professor, Agricultural Chemistry. 

Stewart, C. A Assoc. Professor, Geol. & Mineralogy 

Replacing leave of absence: 
Larson, C. L Instructor, Metallurgy. 

The additions to the instructional staff at the University and in the 
Department of Agricultural Extension for the year 1913-1914 were: 

University Staff: 

Name. Title and Department. 

Brewer, Mary Instructor, Art and Design. 

Lamson, R. A Instructor, Dairy Manufacture. 

Pierce, Jesse Asst. Professor, Mathematics. 

Lucas, Georgia Assistant, Piano Playing. 

Robinson, W. A Assoc. Professor, Political Science. 

Moore, Pren Instructor, Poultry Husbandry. 

Wedsedalek, J. E Professor, Zoology. 



60 Biennial Report, 1913-H 



Extension Department Staff: 

Taylor, E. P A.sst. Director of Horticulture. 

Rinehart, E. F Field Animal Husbandman. 

Parks, T. H Field Entomologist. 

Kelly, Amy Home Economics Exten. Lecturer. 

Johnson, C. E Field Dairyman. 

Thometz, G. F State Seed Inspector. 

Ireland, H. A County Agriculturist,Canyon Co. 

McConnell, T. F County Agriculturist, Lewis Co. 

Vlorrison, John County Agriculturist, Franklin Co. 

1914. 

Acting President W. L, Carlyle was relieved of his major adminis- 
trative work, April 6, 1914, by Melvin A. Brannon who took up his 
duties as President of the University on that date. 

The persons leaving the University Faculty during and at the close 
of the academic year 1913-14 were: 

Name. Title and Department. 

Brewer, Mary Instructor, Art and Design. 

Kinzer, J. C Asst. Professor, Animal Husbandry. 

Fulmer, H Instructor, Bacteriology. 

Temple, C. E Professor, Botany. 

Frevert, G. E Assoc. Professor, Dairying. 

Lehman, B. H Asst. Professor, English. 

Davis, Norma Instructor, Home Economics. 

Sweet, Margaret Asst. Professor, Home Economics. 

Wicks, W. H Professor, Horticulture. 

Larson, C. L Instructor, Metallurgy. 

McCaffery, R. S Professor, Mining and Metallurgy. 

Lucas, Georgia .Assistant, Piano. 

Hobinson, W. A Assoc. Professor, Political Science. 

Hughes, Mrs. M. F Instructor, Violin. 

Extension Department: 

Olin, W. H Director. 

Thometz, G. F State Seed Inspector, 

Leave of Absence, 1914-1915: 

Steinman, D. B Professor, Civil Engineering. 

Moore, H. E Professor, English. 

Isaacson, Mrs. C Asst. Professor, German. 

Larson, G. L Professor, Mechanical Engineering. 

Hostetter, Fay Professor, Piano. 

New members of the Faculty replacing those who did not return in 
the autumn of 1914 were the following: 

Supplying Leave of Absence: 

Name. Title and Department. 

Winslow, A. M Asst. Professor, Civil Engineering. 

Collins, W. N Professor, English. 

Schoch, Caroline Asst, Professor, German. 

Coolidge, C. E Professor, Mechanical Engineering. 

Tuller, Alice E Instructor, Piano. 

Replacements: 

Hickman, C. W Asst. Professor, Animal Husbandry. 

Putnam, J. J Assoc. Professor, Bacteriologry. 



University of Idaho 61 



Holmes, O. W Asst. Professor, Dairying-. 

Currier, L. W Instructor, Geology and Metallurgy. 

Lewis, H. T Assoc. Professor, Political Science. 

Parmelee, D. D Instructor, Violin. 

Extension: 
Regan, S. A State Seed Inspector. 

The additions to the instructional staff at the University and in the 
Department of Agricultural Extension were: 

Robb, N. S Instructor, Agronomy. 

Purmort, G. E Instructor, Civil Engineering. 

Decker, A. D Instructor, Forestry. 

Downing, G. J Assistant, Horticulture. 

Edmundson, W. C Assistant, Horticulture. 

Snow, Chester Professor, Mathematics. 

The persons leaving the University Faculty since July, 1914, were: 

University: 

Carlyle, W. L. Dean, Agricultural College. 

Kennard, P. L Professor, Agronomy. 

Nicholson, J. F Professor, Bacteriology. 

Wilson, L. P Professor, Law. 

Pierce, Jesse Asst. Professor, Mathematics. 

Deaths: 

Stewart, C. A Assoc. Professor, Geol & Mineralogy 

Hall, George Instructor, Machine Shop. 

Extension Department: 

Coglon, R. B State Leader. 

Regan, S. A State Seed Inspector. 

Rinehart, E. F Field Animal Husbandman. 

The following replacements were made: 

Arnold, Earl C Professor, Law. 

Black, John E Instructor, Machine Shop. 

Extension Department: 

Center, O. D Director, 

Hochbaum, H. W State Leader. 

It should be stated further that the administrative work in the 
United States Agricultural Experiment Station and in the Agricultural 
College of the University, relinquished by Director and Dean W. L. 
Carlyle, is being carried on by committees. The Agricultural College 
work is administered by a committee of which Vice Dean E. J. Iddings 
is the chairman, and the work in the Agricultural Experiment Station 
is carried forward by a committee of which Professor J. S. Jones, Vice 
Director of the Station, is chairman. 

The State University of Idaho is composed of the following units: 

1. College of Letters and Sciences, the foundational college having 
charge of the fundamental, disciplinary and cultural subjects which 
underlie the work of the following professional schools: 

2. College of Agriculture, dealing with problems and interests of the 
great industry of agriculture; 



62 Biennial Report, 19 13-1 J^ 

3. College of Engineering, comprising- the divisions of Civil, Mechani- 
cal, Mining, Electrical and Chemical Engineering all of which are inti- 
mately concerned with the leading industries and social relations of 
the State; 

4. College of Law, which trains for high and efficient service at the 
Bar and endeavors to enter into the constructive side of the legal life 
of Idaho. 

5. United States Agricultural Experiment Station, concerned with 
research problems of plant and animal life. 

6. The Division of Agricultural Extension includes the supervision 
of the co-operative investigations at the Experimental Demonstration 
Farms in Bonner County, at Caldwell, Gooding and Aberdeen, also 
supervision of the sections of specialists in animal husbandry, field 
crop, horticulture and entomolog5% dairying, home economics, boys' and 
girls' club work, County Agricultural experts and various other en- 
deavors which are made in carrying from the University center helpful 
information to all the people who are engaged in agricultural activities 
in Idaho. 

Brief reports with reference to each of these six divisions of the 
State University are herewith submitted. 

COLLEGE OF LETTERS AND SCIENCES. 

This College had its organization complete for the first time in the 
history of the University of Idaho by the appointment of the adminis- 
trative officer. Dean C. H. Shattuck. Obviously, the foundational col- 
lege, in which are taught the fundamental subjects for each of the pro- 
fessional schools, is charged with a great responsibility. The responsi- 
bility is two-fold in character: First, that of giving to the young men 
and women of the State a strong and vigorous cultural education; and 
Second, a gounding and discipline in the various subjects upon which 
the superstructure of the different professional schools rest. 

The College of Letters and Sciences is composed of twenty-two de- 
partments, thirty-nine instructors and fellows, and about three hundred 
students. It is the foundational college of the institution since in it are 
taught all the basic subjects such as Mathematics, Botany, Zoology, 
Languages, Chemistry, Physics, etc., essential to thoro work in all 
other colleges. It is, therefore, important that the best instructors and 
equipment be provided for this college. The standards of work and 
scholarship set for the entire institution must be in a large measure 
those established and maintained by it. 

The feeling is somewhat general in the faculty of the College of 
Letters and Sciences that since the work done by it is of such an im- 
portant and fundamental nature, a larger provision in the way of main- 
tenance should be made for it than has heretofore been done. As may 
be seen by reference to the detailed report by departments, submitted 
herewith, many of these departments are provided with comparatively 
meagre equipment in the way of rooms, furniture, teaching force, etc., 
when account is taken of the number of courses given and research 
actually carried on. This is all the more evident when we consider that 
the work carrifd on by this college is absolutely essential to all who 



University of Idaho 63 



would acquire true culture, higher learning, or the ability to conduct 
high-grade research work in any field. It is the backbone of our Uni- 
versity, and I bespeak for it the kind consideration at your hands which 
it merits. V'ery respectfully, 

C. H. SHATTUCK, 
Dean College Letters and Sciences. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

The principal business of the working force since the opening of 
the school year in September has been with the students and, with the 
coming of the students to the School of Practical Agriculture on October 
12th, the amount of teaching required, as shown later, has been nearly 
doubled. 

The year 1913 was a very successful one both in the College and in 
the School of Practical Agriculture. On account of various national 
and international political and economic factors a notable increase of 
attendance was not anticipated. We now have 82 students in the four- 
year courses and 72 in the School of Practical Agriculture and the 
Short Course in Dairying as compared with 63 and 69, respectively, last 
year at this time, a total increase of 16.7 per cent for the three courses. 
The most satisfactory feature of the enrollment is a marked increase 
in the size of the beginning classes. The freshman class shows an in- 
crease of 78 per cent over this, time last year and the first year of the 
School of Practical Agriculture shows the substantial gain of 30 per 
cent. Furthermore, as compared with this time last year, there is a 
100 per cent gain in the senior class. 

The total working force of the College outside of foreman and others 
of similar function consists of 19 men, all of whom but two are doing 
some teaching work. Summarizing the work of the 17 instructors, the 
average class is lield for 3,4 hours per week and numbers 12 students 
and the average instructor teaches 13 hours per week. The least num- 
ber of hours taught by any instructor is four and the greatest number 
is 26. There are 114 hours of long course work per week and 103 hours 
of short course work. 

The College faculty encourages student activities as follows: The 
Agricultural Club, Inter-state Stock Judging, Apple Judging and Butter 
Judging contests. Last year, at the close of the School of Agriculture, 
a day of contests was arranged by the Agricultural Club consisting of 
competition in butter judging, grain judging and stock judging and the 
successful conclusion of the contests was celebrated by a banquet at 
night. This affair made for unity of thought and action among the 
Agricultural students and meant much in the way of good fellowship, 
A similar program for both day and evening, with apple judging added 
to the list of contests, is planned for next March. 

The College as a whole is cramped for class, laboratory and office 
room. Some of the departments will find it impossible to make proper 
growth and development without more space in which to install appar- 
atus and handle students. The other needs of the College are those 
having to do with the regular budgets. 

The members of the Agricultural College faculty are busy thru 
rendering excellent service to the students, the University and the 
State. The students are strong in numbers, average high in scholarship 
and manhood and are with us for a greater University. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. J. IDDINGS, 
Vice Dean College of Agriculture. 



64 Biennial Report, 1913-U 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

At the outset, let me say that the College is in an encouraging condi- 
tion in all respects except enrollment which shows a falling off as is 
seen in the report of Dean Eldridge. This is natural in view of the 
business depression with its consequent stoppage of engineering con- 
struction. Nevertheless, the Engineering College has registered in its 
four-year courses 15 per cent of all the men under collegiate instruc- 
tion at this time , including short courses in Agriculture and Law, 
which, in view of the acknowledged difficulty of the engineering 
courses, is probably its full share. 

Each department is alert and eager to do its utmost not only to make 
as valuable as possible its work for its students, but also to reach 
out and be serviceable in all proper ways to the various interests 
thruout the State that are naturally connected with it. 

The Civil Engineering Department has tested the strength of all ma- 
terial sent to it from any point of the State for a nominal charge to 
cover the cost of the common labor needed in making the test. It is 
enabled to do this by virtue of its possession of a 200,000-pound testing 
machine and its fullj^ equipped cement testing laboratory. The most 
important extra mural service the department is rendering the State 
is in connection with the Highway Commission of which the Senior 
Professor of Civil Engineering is by law a member. Since the organ- 
ization of the Commission in June, 1913, the writer has spent Q5V2 
days in attendance upon its meetings and in traveling in connection 
with its business. By using Sundays for traveling and because of the 
occurence of many meetings in vacations the number of days on which 
a substitute has been required to take his work at the University has 
been kept down to 15 1/^ days. 

By reason of the financial stringency thru which the University 
was passing, no attempt was made to fill the chair of metallurgy va- 
cated by Professor R. S. McCaffery who resigned February, 1914, to 
accept the chair of Metallurgy in the University of Wisconsin. A com- 
petent instructor was secured to care for the instruction of students in 
this subject. In view of the economic importance of this chair to the 
mining interests of the State and the great field for research in con- 
nection with the scientific study of the saving of values now lost in 
low-grade and refractory ores, I recommend provision for filling this 
chair with the most competent man available. 

A machine for testing rock drills was designed and installed during 
the past year by the Mining Department. As is to be expected in con- 
nection with work of this kind worth while, unexpected difficulties have 
been encountered in carrying out this experiment (which promises to 
be of considerable practical value) which required the design and con- 
struction of additional apparatus for which, for the time being, no funds 
were available. 

There has been co-operation between the Mining Engineering De- 
partment and the Department of Geology in making three maps of differ- 
ent sections of the State indicating thereon the mineral and geological 
character of the ground covered. One report has been published and 
another is in process of preparation. The Department of Mining is 
greatly interested, as is shown by what it has already done in assist- 
ing in a geological and mineral survey of the State which is greatly 
needed. It is hoped that it may be possible to ask the Legislature for 
a small cumulative appropriation to begin such a survey under the 
leadershiit of the University thru its DciJurtmont of Geology. 

The generous spirit of the Department of Mining in carrying on the 
work of in.sir uctiftn in (ieology during the fatal illness of Professor C. 



University of Idaho 65 



A. Stewart, head of that department, should be recog-nized. This work 
has been possible by the sacrifice of time which would otherwise have 
been available for research. 

With the desire to increase the usefulness of the University to the 
people of the State, the Department of Electrical Engineering- is co- 
operating- with the Physics Department in building up a standardizing 
laboratory whose certificate on any piece of apparatus shall be as de- 
pendable as one from the National Bureau of Standards at Washington. 
The addition of a storage battery during- the past year was a long step 
ahead in this direction. 

It is not putting ic coo ^strongly to say that the ultimate prosperity of 
the State will depend very largely on the work of men trained in Mechan- 
ical, Electrical and Chemical Engineering. As a hint of what may be ex- 
pected in one direction, note the exclusive use of electricity in place of 
fuel for heating and cooking in many homes, places of business and 
schools on the Minidoka project w^here the electrical energy for these 
purposes is a by-product of its use for pumping water for irrigation 
in summer. Idaho has a wealth of unused water power and a crying 
demand for the development of manufactures to absorb the products 
of her agriculture. In supporting- the Mechanical, Electrical and Chem- 
ical Departments of the Engineering College, for the training of men 
to take part in this development, the State will show wise foresight. 
Respectfully submitted. 

C. N. LITTLE, 
Dean College of Engineering-. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

From the very full and comprehensive Report of the Dean of the 
Law School, the following summary is important: 

The attendance and the spirit of the student body are considered 
most encouraging. Thirty-four students are enrolled this year as 
against 22 at a corresponding time last year. 

In this connection, it should be noted that this is the last year during 
which the student can be admitted direct from the high school. Next 
year, one year of work in the College of Letters and Sciences in this 
University, or its equivalent, will be required, and the year after next, 
two years of such college work will be required as a prerequisite for 
admission to the Law School with the view of obtaining a degree in law. 

The general spirit of fraternity and loyalty and of hard work that 
pervades this law school is well known. 

In the Law faculty, the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of 
Professor Lyman P. Wilson has been filled by the appointment of Pro- 
fessor Earl C. Arnold. Dr. F. L. Barrows, of Moscow, has consented 
to give his services for a course in Medical Jurisprudence. The per- 
sonnel of the faculty remains the same in other respects as that cf 
last year. 

It should be noted that the curriculum of the Law School requires 
an excessive number of hours of the present staff, and this should be 
corrected by the employment of an additional instructor at the earliest 
moment possible. 

Courses of study are set forth in a special College of Law bulletin 
which announces three new courses in addition to the curriculum of 
the preceding year. 

The College of Law maintains a Practice Court and a Law Club, both 
of which make valuable contributions to the intensive and professional 
training of students in law. 



66 Biennial Report, 1913-lU 



The College of Law endeavors to articulate with the other colleges 
and, particularly, with certain departments in the College of Letters 
and Sciences in the University. The entire attitude of faculty and 
students is one of generous co-operation. 

The Law library is entirely inadequate to the demands which are 
continually increasing. Thru gifts during the past year, it has been 
increased by over 1,000 volumes. Inasmuch as the library in the Col- 
lege of Law represents the apparatus of a scientific laboratory, it is 
manifest that earnest and immediate attention should be given to 
meeting this need. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE D. AYERS, 

Dean of Law. 

The evidence presented in the extensive report of the Dean of Law 
College relative to interest, student attendance, high standards of 
scholarship and loyalty to the University, and provision for increasing 
the standards of legal education from year to year, is convincing and 
satisfying with reference to the importance of the place held by the 
Law School in the University of Idaho. Its influence, support and 
service must be increased and extended rapidly with the development 
of the commonwealth. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

For the most part, the work has been that of experimentation and 
research, but the element of demonstration has not been lacking. It 
is possibly not necessary to distinguish sharply between the work of 
experimentation and that of research, but the policy of the Experiment 
Station has been to support the first mentioned with Hatch and special 
appropriation and donation funds and the second with Adams funds. 
Definitely outlined work conducted with any fund is designated a pro- 
ject. In the Experiment Station proper there are now nine departments 
with 20 men devoting more or less of their time to its work. Eight of 
these departments have worked on one or more projects during the 
last two years. The other department has recently submitted a pro- 
ject for approval. Of the 16 projects supported with Hatch funds. 
Agronomy has had three. Animal Husbandry three, Chemistry one, Hor- 
ticulture eight and Soils ono. Of the six projects supported with Adams 
funds. Bacteriology and Dairying have had one jointly. Bacteriology 
one alone. Chemistry one. Horticulture one and Soils two. The several 
projects enumerated by title are stated below: 

Supported with Hatch Funds. 

Agronomy: Variety tests on (1) small grains'; (2) potatoes; (3) 
certain lagumes. 

Animal Husbandry: (1) sheep and lamb feeding experiment on the 
Caldwell Demonstration Farm; (2) lamb and pig feeding experiment 
on the central Experiment Station Farm; (3) sheep breeding work. 

Note: The above were supported in part with live stock appropri- 
ation funds. 

Chemistry: (1) a study of north Idaho timber soils. 

Horticulture: (l)onion growing; (2) fruit canning; (3) winter versus 
summer pruning of apples; (4) lime sulphur spray for apple scab; (5) 
small fruit culture; (6) crude oil emulsions for the control of oyster 
shell bnrk scjile; (1) variety tests of vegetables; (8)testing of relative 



University of Idaho 67 



merits of one, two and three applications of arsenicals for the control 
of the codling moth. 

Soils: (1) crop rotation for Palouse soils. 

Supported with Adams Funds. 

Bacteriolog-y and Dairying: (1) butter deterioration. 

Bacteriology: (1) isolation of -prevalent types of Palouse soil bac- 
teria. 

Chemistry: (1) factors affecting the protein content of Idaho grown 
wheat. 

Horticulture: (1) apple breeding. 

Soils: (1) duty of water; (2) investigation of the slick spots in south 
Idaho soils. 

Supported with special donation funds: 

Horticulture and Agricultural Engineering: (1) orchard irrigation 
investigations. 

Of the above-named projects, those mentioned in Agronomy, the first 
named in Animal Husbandry, that named in Bacteriology and Dairying 
and the first and second mentioned under Hatch funds in Horticulture 
have been terminated. Reports covering them can be furnished by the 
departments concerned at any time. It is planned to continue all other 
projects named above. 

The announced intention of those having in charge the direction of 
the Experiment Station and the Extension Department, when the last 
named was organized, v\ras to connect the work of the Experiment Sta- 
tion men, the superintendents of the Demonstration farms and the fiald 
specialists. Failure to realize fully on this intention is painfully evi- 
dent. There appears to be on the part of the field specialists, in par- 
ticular, an independence of action which limits or discourages the rom- 
plete rounding out of Experiment Station activities. It is believed that 
in a conference of those charged with the direction of the several lines 
of work mentioned, much could be accomplished in the nature of secur- 
ing more perfect co-operation. 

The work of the station as planned covers fairly well the wants of the 
State. It is doubtful if an increase in the number of departments is 
desirable at this time, but certain ones should be broadened and strength- 
ened to permit of increased usefulness. There are numerous feeding 
problems peculiar to the northwest. The Department of Chemistry 
should be broadened to take in nutrition investigations in co-operation 
with Animal Husbandry. The Poultry Department is in its infancy. 
It should receive particular encouragement during the next two years. 
Means should be found of overcoming its present cramped situation. 

The Soils Department should be strengthened in a way which will 
permit of its being able to give the practical information regarding dif- 
ferent soils of the State so often asked of it. Greenhouse facilities are 
inadequate and inconvenient for the work different departments wish 
to conduct. Additional greenhouse space should be provided. 

One very direct result of the passage of the Smith-Lever bill is a de- 
cided increase in demands made upon Experiment Station workers for 
reliable data and information. Each of the projects enumerated has 
been planned to provide for certain well defined wants, but it is im- 
possible to push them all vigorously with Federal funds alone. The 
Hatch fund should be substantially supplemented by State appropriation 
for experimental work. Departments for which such an appropriation 
might well be asked are Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Poultry and 
Soils. Respectfully submitted, 

J. S. JONES, 

Vice Director. 



Biennial Report, 1913-14 



It will be noted that the work reported for the United States Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station at the University of Idaho is research. All 
of these projects are supported entirely by Federal funds. 

Research at the University of Idaho is further represented by the 
notable work in the Department of Forestry. This department has car- 
ried forward research which means great contributions to the wealth 
of the State and nation, particularly in the discoveries in regard to the 
by-products contained in the stumps of logged-off lands, and by the 
remarkable results gotten in processing lumber made from inferior 
woods. In addition to the above, the Department of Forestry has been 
for the past six years experimenting with some 160 species of forest 
trees in order to determine those best suited for growth in Idaho. 
For the past three years, the department has been growing a large num- 
ber of seedlings of the different species which have been found suitable 
to our climatic conditions. These have been furnished to farmers, civic 
improvement societies, parks etc., at the cost of growing. At the pres- 
ent time, approximately, a million trees are growing in the forestry 
nursery ready for distribution the coming spring. 

In Mining Engineering, research has been carried on in the State 
of Idaho relative to two distinct and important matters: one, securing 
data for the making of a relief map of the State; another, dealing with 
the topographical survey of some low regions of the State in order that 
the mineralogical and geological features may be determined and pub- 
lished. Perhaps the most notable contribution from the Mining Engi- 
neering Department is the work which Mr. G. H. Wyman has done in 
flotation studies in mining. He began this work in the University and 
has extended it since so that more than $100,000 a year is being saved 
the mining interests of the State wholly thru the use of the flota- 
tion processes, as worked out by a graduate of our Mining Engineering" 
Department. 

One of the leading problems in Idaho is associated with the storage 
of fruit. Co-operative research is being carried on in fruit storage by 
the three departments of Botany, Chemistry and Horticulture. Effort 
is being made to discover the physical and chemical factors which are 
included in the exceedingly complex problems of maturation and ripen- 
ing of fruits. 

Research is being carried on in the Department of Physics and Mathe- 
matics relative to heat phenomena and problems in magnetism in refer- 
ence to different metals. 

The most notable literary contribution made by any research worker 
of the University of Idaho is readily credited to the head of the De- 
partment of History. It is published under the name of "Renaissance 
and Reformation." The octavo volume of 589 pages contains results of 
years of intensive study at Harvard and Cornell Universities and in the 
universities of Europe. These and other historical studies have been 
continued at the University of Idaho. It is planned to begin a history 
of the State of Idaho as soon as facilities for this important work can 
be provided. The institution and the State are to be complimented and 
congratulated because the scholarly author is a member of the staff 
of the State University. 

Important historical research is being carried on in the Department 
of Latin dealing with the factors which furnish an index to the social 
position and social relations of men of Rome. This has an important 
sociological relationship to the civilization of all nations and all times. 
Encouragement and importance should be attached to fundamental stud- 
ies rjf this character. The results of this work are now in the hands of 
publishers. 



University of Idaho 69 



The Department of Romance Languages has published contributions 
setting forth the research carried on in the development and relation- 
ship of important matters in the growth and use of romance languages. 
While the direct application of such work may not be easily shown, its 
benefits are manifest in the quality of teaching done in the department 
and in the general influence of research spirit upon the whole institu- 
tional life. 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DEPARTMENT. 

The University of Idaho Agricultural Extension Department has been 
fortunate in securing Mr. O. D. Center as organizer and director. The 
work is varied and complex. Only a thoroly trained and vigorous 
organizer and demonstrator could meet the demands of the department. 
Mr. Center assumed the duties of director October 1, 1914. Manifestly, 
no report could be offered by him at this time. He has, however, 
reviewed the reports of Prof. W. H. Olin, in charge of the work from 
January 1 to April 1, 1914; of the superintendents at the various State 
Demonstration Farms and of the field specialists. He summarizes these 
reports as follows: 

GENERAL PLAN OF THE WORK. 

In the organization and operation of the Extension Department the 
funds provided by the Federal government, which include the $10,000 
received under the provision of the Smith-Lever Act, as well as special 
appropriations from the Bureau of Plant Industry, are devoted almost 
wholly to county agent and farm demonstration work. This work is 
co-operative. The parties to the agreement are Extension Department 
and the United States Department of Agriculture on the one hand, and 
the counties of the State on the other. The citizens of the State are 
the parties served. 

The general plan of the extension work of the University of Idaho 
embraces four broad lines of activity, — Demonstration, Information, 
Organization and Investigation. The direct application of these lines 
is made by and thru the director of * extension, the State leader of 
county agriculturists, the field animal husbandman, field horticulturist, 
field entomologist, field dairyman, pure seed commissioner, field workers 
in home economics, organizer of boys' and girls' club work, the super- 
intendents of the State demonstration farms, county agricultural agents, 
director and organizer of community betterment clubs, field potato 
specialist, field specialist on markets and marketing, and field specialist 
on farm management. 

Back of all these, lending assistance whenever required, as well as 
conducting the necessary laboratory work, is the entire staff of the 
several departments of the University and of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station of Idaho, and speciali- 'ts from the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

INSTITUTES AND MOVABLE SCHOOLS. 

The records of Prof. W. H. Olin show that in January, 1914, institutes 
were held at Richfield, Hagerman, Jerome, Mountain Home and Wendell, 
which had a combined attendance of 492 farmers. Beginning January 
26, movable schools were held at Fruitland, Kuna and Nampa, also at 
Burley and Buhl. In February sixteen one-day institutes, two two-day 
institutes, and three three-day institutes were held. These included ses- 
sions for both men and women. Total attendance at the institutes was 



70 Biennial Report, 1913-14- 



5482, at the movable schools 5203. To serve as many as possible in this 
work, the extension staff was divided into two groups, each group giving 
practically the same work at the same time, but in wholly different parts 
of the State. 

This fall there has been held both at Meridian and Payette a farmer's 
institute and corn show. At these meetings we addressed 283 farmers 
and business men. A dairy demonstration train made a two days' trip 
over the Idaho Traction Company's electric loop. Five stops, each an 
hour in length, were made each day. 1286 farmers were reached in Ada 
and Canyon counties during the two days of the trip. 

Three cycles of movable schools are arranged for December, 1914, at 
St. Maries, Clarks Fork, and Rathdrum in Bonner and Kootenai coun- 
ties; Oakley, Rupert and Gooding in Cassia, Minidoka and Gooding 
counties, and Hailey, Gannett and Richfield in Lincoln and Blaine coun- 
ties. The fourth and fifth cycles, partially completed, will include 
Grangeville, Orofino, and Winchester in Lewis, Clearwater, and Nez 
Perce counties and Franklin, Bannock, Bear Lake and Oneida counties. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The Home Economics work of the Extension Department touches 
vitally the entire life and development of every community. It is ap- 
plicable in the home of every citizen of Idaho, no matter what may be 
his calling, occupation or business. During the past year 84 home econ- 
omic meetings have been held. A detailed record shows 16 miscellan- 
eous meetings, 10 women's club meetings, 29 institute meetings, 8 county 
agent meetings, 6 teachers' meetings and 15 county superintendents' 
meetings. In these meetings 3987 women of the State have been met 
and helped. 

In addition to the above there have been numerous bread, canning, 
sewing, flower, and cooking clubs organized among the girls and young 
women of the State. Enlarged plans for the coming year purpose to 
carry the work of Home Economics to all the women of the State irre- 
spective of station or locality, but with especial attention to isolated 
communities and the rural women. 

THE COUNTY AGRICULTURIST 

The county agriculturist movement is winning friends in Idaho, for the 
men at work in the State have demonstrated that the county agricul- 
turist is the man whose services are most directly useful to' the farmer. 
No doubt we shall see a great development of the movement within the 
next few years and it is probable that the time is not far distant when 
every county will employ an agriculturist. 

At present the movement cannot make rapid progress, for our laws do 
not clearly define to what extent county commissioners may co-operate 
in meeting the expenses of a county agriculturist. Since the terms of 
the Smith-Lever Act require that appropriations to a state must be 
duplicated by the State, or county, the path must be cleared, that coun- 
ties may take advantage of the funds available. In some states these 
Federal funds are further supplemented by direct appropriations from 
the state. This brings about a rapid development of the movement. 
The combined help of Federal and state funds has made it possible 
for several states already to have more than 25 men in the field. 

The county agriculturist is more than an expert or a mere bureau of 
information. I'o bo sure this may be the first service expected of the 
man, yet it is probably of least importance in the permanent improve- 
ment of our farming and rural affairs. I'he great work of the county 



University of Idaho 71 



agriculturist is the development of leadership. The development and 
direction of this talent, to inspire for greater efficiency, to help the men 
and women of a community to "find themselves," — this is his work that 
is of most lasting value. In directing the men and women to a better 
and broader conception of the fundamental principles of agriculture, 
farm management and household economy, he helps them solve their 
problems for themselves. 

A brief list of some activties and accomplishments of our county agri- 
culturists, here appended, will show how far these men reach out, and 
how near they come to the problems of the individual and the com- 
munity. Fifteen farmers' clubs organized in Ada and Canyon counties; 
58 farmers' meetings addressed in one year bj^ one agent; 65 by another; 
33 silos were erected through the influence of the county agent in one 
county last year. Eight of these are of concrete, in the building of 
which the agent helped; four cow testing associations organized; in 
addition, 1500 single tests were made; over 100 field demonstrations of 
various kinds conducted and supervised by the county agriculturists; 
1000 hogs vaccinated by one agriculturist. This man is now organizing 
his entire county for anti-hog cholera work; 130 farms grew corn last 
year under the supervision of county agents, where before there was not 
half this number of farms upon which corn was grown; three community 
corn shows organized by county men. 

A dairy demonstration train was run over 60 miles of electric road by 
two county agents in co-operation with the Extension Department. 
Five stops were made each day and over 1200 people were given instruc- 
tion on the selection of the dairy cow, her feeding and care and on silos 
and silage. 

The agents in Canyon and Franklin counties in particular are doing 
excxeptionally good work thru the rural schools, by interesting the 
young people of the county in better farming and better home keeping. 
The agriculturist of Franklin county, has, in addition to organizing and 
encouraging the usual club work, interested the rural children in some 
part time work that is most instructive and valuable. 

One county agent, thru the organization of a Co-operative asso- 
ciation, effected a saving of from 60 to 75 cents per hundred on hogs 
marketed; 70 carloads shipped during the year by this association sold 
at an average of less than $1.00 under Portland prices, instead of $1.50 
to $2.00 as before,— a saving of from $10,000 to $12,000. 

FIELD ANIMAL HUSBANDMAN 

The annual report of the Field Animal Husbandman is sufficiently 
large and is of such excellence that it will later appear as an extension 
publication. His work includes nine distinct lines of development, all 
pertaining to the enlargement and improvement of the live stock inter- 
ests of the State. These lines of work are silos, buildings, especially 
barns and stock sheds, sheep, beef cattle, swine, dairying, selection of 
breeding stock, judging at fairs, general meetings, and hog cholera 
control. 

He has in the year constructed for farmers, 11 silos, planned and 
superintended the erection of five barns, organized 69 hog cholera con- 
trol associations, conducted 38 advanced registry and eight register of 
merit tests of dairy herds, selected 40 pure bred animals, selected 230 
feeders for stockmen, acted as judge at 14 fairs, accompanied one de- 
monstration train, attended 47 meetings, given 80 lectures and demon- 
strations in which 13,096 people were addressed, and made a total of 
1147 farm visits which represent 762 different farms. A year's work of 
tremendous magnitude and even greater results. 



72 Biennial Report, 1913-U 



It would be unfair both to the field animal husbandman and to the 
Bureau of Animal Industry U S. D. A., with whom the Extension de- 
partment is co-operating-, to fail to mention the excellent work done in 
hog cholera control. On May 23rd this field specialist went to Twin 
Palls to take charge of the organization for hog cholera eradication 
work. The district covered was the south side, and the north side, 
Twin Falls segregation with its extensions; all Gooding county under 
the Idaho Irrigation Company's segregation, and all territory included 
in the Minidoka project. The school district was made the unit for the 
work and a leader selected in each district to promptly report any 
trouble, or outbreak. As the cholera loss was greatest on the Twin 
Falls South Side Tract, the results of the co-operative work done in 
this area are given. 

Died of 
Cholera. 

No. farms reported 2,370 

No. hogs raised in 1912 28,283 2,432 

No. hogs raised in 1913 43,795 10,887 

No. hogs raised in 1914 38,503 669 

This shows that over 8^/2 per cent of the hogs on this area died of 
cholera in 1912; more than 24 per cent died in 1913 and less than 2 per 
cent in 1914. 

After the tract had been organized by the animal husbandman, and 
co-operative work established with the United States Bureau of Animal 
Industry, the enormous losses of 1913 were controlled and reduced to 
an almost negligible number. 

FIELD HORTICULTURIST 

The work of the Field Horticulturist is classified under seven heads: 

1. Farmers' institutes and extension schools. 2. Orchard pruning 
and top grafting demonstrations. 3. Orchard site studies. 4. Orchard 
irrigation investigations. 5. Fruit storage investigations. 6. Miscel- 
laneous horticultural visits and studies. 

Particular attention is directed to the work being done by the field 
representative of the horticultural department of the University in or- 
chard irrigation and fruit storage investigations. The irrigation inves- 
tigations have five objects in view: 1. Determination of amount of 
water to mature a crop of apples. 2. Determination of relation of irri- 
gation to fruit bud formation. 3. Determination of influence of irriga- 
tion on keeping qualit.v of fruit. 4. Determination of influence of irri- 
gation on production of fancy and extra fancy grades, 5. Determina- 
tion of influence of soil moisture on general health of trees. 

The storage investigations include a study of best types of fruit stor- 
age houses for different objects, a determination of best methods of 
apple production when intended for several types of storage, a study of 
the proper way to handle fruit to be stored, a study of the rots and 
defects causing deterioration or decay in storage, as well as storage 
house management, which includes studies of temperature, moisture 
and ventilation. 

PURE SEED WORK 

The pure seed work contributes to the direct financial betterment of 
every seed grower of the State. The report of the commissioner shows 
that there has been a total of 3287 lots of farm seed analyzed. A 
large proportion of these samples were alfalfa and the clovers. The 



University of Idaho 73 



noxious weed seeds on which the largest number of the samples 
analyzed were condemned, are dodder, buckhorn and mustard. In 

1913 there was condemned 27.1 per cent of all seed analyzed. In 

1914 this decreased to 25.8 per cent. This shows that the stand- 
ard of seed sold in Idaho has been appreciably bettered. The in- 
spection work of the commissioner is but a part of the work done. 
He has discussed at institutes, meetings, fairs, etc., quality of seed and 
economy of planting seed free from weed seeds. He has advanced im- 
proved methods of seed production through better methods of planting, 
culture, irrigation, and harvesting He has shown that the growing 
weed in the seed field is the vital point of attack in the weed and pure 
seed problem of the State; that it is economy to rogue fields and remove 
all weeds before cutting the seed field. He has distributed new or im- 
proved varieties of grass, alfalfa, peas, etc. He has given assistance 
in marketing the seed crop. He has urged a greater diversification of 
crops, to the end that there may be greater economy of labor as well as 
production. 

DEMONSTRATION FARMS. 

Gooding. 

The work carried on embraces twelve distinct lines of investigations 
all of which are direct value to any section of the State under similar 
conditions. 1. Duty of water,— amount required for ordinary crops to 
secure most economical results. Crops used are alfalfa, barleys, wheat, 
oats, potatoes, clover. 2. Duty of water, — amount required to affect the 
movement of nitric nitrogen in soil and thus exert effect on chemical 
composition and milling of wheat. 3. Time of irrigation at various 
stages of plant growth. Effect on plant structure and crop. 4. Method 
of irrigation, — comparative study of corrugation method versus flood- 
ing. 5. Variety tests of grains, grasses, roots, etc. 6. Pasture mix- 
tures and grazing tests. 7. Comparative value of whole and cut seed 
potatoes. 8. Corn experiments for silage and grain. 9. Alfalfa and 
clover seed production. 10. Clover seed production to avoid damage by 
Chalcis fly. 11. Test and cultural methods in varieties of vegetables 
for home garden. 12. Production and distribution of proved and pure 
varieties of grain. 

A bulletin giving plan and progress of the work done has already been 
distributed. A second bulletin dealing especially with the work of pas- 
ture mixture and grazing tests is ready for distribution, — work of incal- 
culable value since it is thoro, complete, authentic and any one inter- 
ested can see what is being accomplished. 

Aberdeen. 

This farm, a co-operative project in which the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture contributes one-half the support, should '">e 
given more liberal support by the State since problems, studies and 
work done on this farm apply so particularly to a very large portion of 
Idaho. The work includes investigations on both dry land and irrigated 
land. The work is practically duplicated on both areas. 

The general farm operations include, under dry land methods: 1. Soil 
moisture investigations. 2. Variety tests of cereal crops. 3. Cultiva- 
tion experiments including six different methods of preparation, plant- 
ing, cultivation and harvesting which deal directly with moisture con- 
servation, 4. Twenty- nine different crop rotations varying ironi two 
to six years for completion. 5. Experiments with alfalfa including nine 
lines of investigation for hay and seed production. 6. Experiments 



74 Biennial Report, 1913-1^ 



with potato production along eight distinct lines. 7. Miscellaneous 
cropping tests which include several varieties of dry land grains and 
grasses under varied conditions. 8. Co-operative work with the United 
States Department of Agriculture in plant disease studj' and control. 

Irrigated land investigations: 1. Soil moisture studies. 2. Varietal 
tests which include 450 strains and varieties of cereals. 3. Alfalfa 
investigations duplicating and augmenting those of No. 5 above. 4. The 
same with clovers. 5. A check and duplication of No. 5 above, under 
irrigated conditions which also include co-operative work and tests 
with the United States Department of Agriculture and with seed from 
Maine and Michigan in comparison to Idaho seed. 6. Mixtures of pas- 
ture grasses suitable for varied farm conditions. This work supplements 
that of the Gooding station. 7. Miscellaneous cropping tests under irri- 
gated conditions. These include cereals, grasses and legumes. 8. Special 
work in co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture 
which includes cereal investigations, pomological and horticultural inves- 
tigations, forage crop investigations and plant disease of truck crops. 

Bonner County Farm. 

Work is still in its first stages of development. It presents a line of 
work greatly needed in the logged over country and absolutely essential 
to the development of that part of the State and necessary for the best 
and greatest service of the Extension department. It is very probable 
that in time this farm can be made almost self-supporting. 

Canyon County Farm. 

Work outlined in previous reports is still being continued. A dairy 
herd has been purchased pursuant to the action of the last Legislature, 
and upon its development will contribute largely to the farm's support. 

THE FIELD ENTOMOLOGIST. 

The work of the Field Entomologist has had to do with several lines 
of activity. Nearly all the work done has been in Southern Idaho since 
the northern part of the State presents fewer problems which come 
under this division, and these can be handled from the University. 

In addition to the insect work done, he has attended 19 farmers' insti- 
tutes and six movable schools, where he gave 43 addresses, to 2,450 
farmers. He also gave 18 days of instruction work to the Short Course 
students at the University. 

The insect studies and control work done has been concerned with 
the distribution and control of the alfalfa weevil, the clover and alfalfa 
seed Chalcis fly, the grasshopper, clover-leaf weevil, alfalfa caterpillars, 
clover aphis. Mormon crickets, bean maggots, cabbage insects, cherry 
clugs, orchard plant lice, San Jose scale and codling moth. A compara- 
tive study of sprays and crop rotations was made in endeavoring to ex- 
terminate these injurious insects. 

THE TEACHING WORK OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The Commissioner of P^ducation, Dr. Edward O. Sisson, has wisely 
called attention to the fact that we are in danger of giving so much 
attention to the machinery of education that we shall overlook the 
functions and the results of education. Naturally the people of the 
State are primarily interested in the service which is rendered to their 
sons and daughters who are students at the University. Unless a high 
8tand;jrd of schoUistic life is maintained, thoro discipline and liberal 



University of Idaho 75 



CL.iLuit secuiet., ttnu worthy characters formed in the student life of the 
Institution, there can be no legitimate reason for its support and con- 
tinuance. In order to secure these results great care has been exercised 
in selecting the instructional staff of the University, and much study 
has been given to the organization of the faculty in order that the work 
in class room and laboratory may be wisely correlated and supervised 
thru committees, such as those having in charge admission of stud- 
ents, scholarship, health, athletics and social activities. 

While there is much remaining to be done, there is evidence that en- 
couraging progress is being made in the development and maintenance 
of proper scholarship in the University of Idaho. 

The data which have been worked out with great fidelity as to detail 
and accuracy, as presented in the following tables, indicate something 
of the progress, classification and scholastic activities of the student 
body. 



Table I— Detailed Statement of Enrollment, 1912-13 



Degree or Course 



College of Letters and 
Sciences 



College of 
Agr. 



College of Engineering 



Col. 

of 

Law 

PQ 

hi 



HO 



i6 



(iraduates 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassed 

School of Prac. Agriculture 
5-Months Dairy Course. . . . 

Forest Rangers 

Miners' Short Course .... | . . | . . 
Totals by Courses | 93 | 81 



2S 

30 33 

3 I 3 

.. 1 .. 



73 

I 7 



I 12 
8 



I 57 



24 I 



37 



Totals by Colleges | 282 | | 


137 1 


80 


1 37 


1 536 










32 












Summer School (202) (Less duplicates in regular session) 


























1 763 











Table II— Detailed Statement of Enrollment, 1913-H 







College of Letters and 
Sciences 


College of 
Agr. 


College of Engineering 


Coll. 

of 

Law 

PQ 

-3 


II 

HO 


Degree or Course 




CQ 


o3 

1 




1 


be 
< 


•I2 

la 




be 

c 




J3 





r.raduates . . 

Seniors 


1 1 1 1 

1 .. 1 I 1 .. 1 .. 

1 IS 1 11 1 II I 


3 

8 

I 

19 


4 
9 
! -o 
•3 
-'4 
3 

1 73, 


• 

• 




7 

8 
5 
8 


3 
4 
1 1 


3 

3 

6 


3 


V 


6 

10 




7 


Juniors 

S(;i)liomorts 

Freshmen 


20 

1 22 
1 29 

1 5 
1 .. 
1 •• 
1 •• 
1 91 


16 1 .. 1 8 

14 1 .. 1 10 

1 m 1 . . 1 i-i 


..| .. 

2 1 4 
3 


80 
t6? 


Unclassed 


10 

.. 

•• 

•• 

I105 


41 12 

42 1 44 


. . 1 . . 


.. I i .. 
.. ..| .. 

8'| 9' 25 


74 


School of I'rac. Agri. ...".. 
School of Home Science . . 

^-Mo Dairy Course 

Totals by Courses 


71 

7 

10 

88 


29 


20 


71 

7 

10 


'1 otals by Colleges , . 




1 301 


.61 


1 


8 





2 5 


567 


Summer School (201) 


Less i 


I duplicates in regular s 


ession 










180 












Crand Total . . . 















747 



Table III— Detailed Statement of Enrollment, 19U-15. (To Oct. 31, 19U) 
Part of First Semester 

(Note that this table is not comparable with those for full preceding years.) 



Degree or Course 



College of Letters and 
Sciences 



College of 
Agr. 



.:): to 



College of Engineering 



Coll. 

of 

Law 






Graduates 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Unclassed 

School .of Prac. Agri. 
5-Mo. Dairy Course 

Forest Rangers 

Totals hv Courses . . . 



25 



25 



38 



16 



34 



7 
65 
67 
89 
168 
35 
72 
5 



Totals by Colleges | 265 | | 158 | 


51 


1 34 


508 


Summer School (loi) Less duplicates in regtrlar session (16) ... . 






85 


Grand Total . 






593 









Comparative Enrollment of Men and 


Wom.en in Regular Session 






1912-13 


1913-14 1 1914-15 




Men 


Women 


Men 


Women Men 


Women 


College of Letters and Sciences 

Per Cent 


97 185 
34-5 1 65.5 


103 
34.3 


198 100 
65.7 1 37.7 


165 
62.3 






College of Agriculture 


129 1 8 
94-1 1 5.8 


153 
95 


8 1 157 
5 1 99-4 


I 


Per Cent 


6 








80 1 

100 1 


80 
100 


1 51 

1 100 




Per Cent 








College of Law 


37 
100 







25 
100 


I 34 

1 100 




Per Cent 








Total 1 343 1 I93 

Total Per Cent | 64 | 36 


361 
63.7 


206 1 342 
36.3 1 67.4 


166 
32.6 



78 



Biennial Report, 1913-14- 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT, 1892-1915 

In the following table only strictly collegiate students are counted, 
since these alone constitute a true index of the University's growth. 
Thus are omitted from consideration students of the following groups: 
(1) Summer Session; (2) Music Specials; (3) School of Practical Agri- 
culture; (4) Miners' Short Course; (5) Forest Rangers; (6) Preparatory 
School (abolished in 1913.) 



1892-93 6 

1893-94 16 

1894-95 28 

1895-96 46 

1896-97 65 

1897-98 87 

1898-99 79 

1899-00 106 

1900-01 .• 139 

1901-02 140 

1902-03 146 



1903-04 
1904-05 
1905-06 
1906-07 
1907-08 
1908-09 
1909-10 



153 
176 
202 
231 
246 
267 
303 



1910-11 329 

1911-12 367 

1912-13 399 

1913-14 43» 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS, 1914-15, TO 
OCTOBER 31, 1914 



Summary. 



College 

Idaho 345 

Nineteen States other than Idaho 57 

Two Foreign Countries 4 

Total 406 

Counties in Idaho. 

College 

Ada 48 

Adams 4 

Bannock 13 

Bear Lake 3 

Bingham 3 

Blaine 4 

Boise 2 

Bonner 12 

Bonneville 5 

Canyon 36 

Cassia 1 

Clearwater 1 

Custer 

Elmore 

Franklin 2 

Frfimont 1 

Gooding 4 

Idaho 8 

Jefferson 



1914 
Summer Special 
School Courses 


Total 


73 89 


507 


12 12 


81 


1 


5 



85 



102 



593 



Summer 


Special 




School 


Courses 


Total 








48 








4 








13 








3 








3 







5 







6 


1 




14 







6 


1 


11 


48 







2 







2 







1 

















2 


2 


2 


5 





3 


7 


4 


6 


18 












University of Idaho 



79 



College 

Kootenai 35 

Latah 91 

Lemhi 2 

Lewis 10 

Lincoln ., 4 

Madison 1 

Minidoka 3 

Nez Perce 11 

Oneida 1 

Owyhee 2 

Power 1 

Shoshone 20 

Twin Falls 12 

Washington 5 

Total 345 



Summer 
School 
14 


Special 

Courses 

5 


Total 
54 


30 


31 


152 





3 


5 





2 


12 


1 


2 


7 





1 


2 





1 


4 


10 


4 


25 








1 








2 








1 


8 





28 





4 


16 


2 


4 


11 



73 



102 



507 









Table VIII 


—Graduates by Years and Curricula 








^ 












tm 


be 


bo 


be 


bo 


OJ 








< 








03 




c 


c 




"rt C 


c 


2 






Year 


< 


Spa 

^ J2 




•|5 




>> 


"•S 


■P-I 


2§ 


"si 


II 

i-bo 


3 


^ 


3 




<J 


Hb 


0(Q 


§5 


B^ 


^ 




SI 


WW 






< 


)-3 


^ 


1896 ... 




, 









1 
1 2 














4 


1897 






2 1 2 





















5 

8 


i8q8 






2 2 1 .^ 





1 1 I 














1899 




1 I 1 ^ 1 2 


.... 


1 1 . - 


I 












7 
10 










1 1 I 


3 
3 












1901 






9 |....| 8 


I 1 1 2 













24 


1902 
1903 






1*1 1 2 


1*1 . 1 . 


4 

2 












10** 






13 |....| 12 


1 1 1 2 


I 




.... 






31 


i9oa^ 
190S 






8 |....| 4 


. . 1 I 


I 












14 
14 
29 








2 


I 
















J 




I 


.... 








1907 






8*|....| ID 


2 .... 1 .... 1 2 


5 


7 










33** 


1908 






10 |....| 5 


I 1 — 1 • • • • 1 2 


7 


4 


.... 








29 


1909 




1 17 I--..I 5 


2 1 I |....| 6 


6 






.... 


2 




40 


1910 




1 9*|--..| 2 


I 1 I |....| 2 


7 




.... 




7 




29 


1911 




1 i5*|....| 3 


3 1 I 1 3*1 9* 


5 








4 




43 


1912 




1 8 |....| 8 


2 1 I 


..••1 5 


4 






.... 


4 


9 


42 


1913 






15 ...-I 4 


I 1 4 


2 1 5 


I 








9 


12* 


53'* 


1914 ... 


15 — i 14 

1 1 


I 1 I 
1 


I 1 7 
1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


9 


6 


64 


Totals . . . 


I 

158*1 6 90 

1 1 


1 1 1 
17*1 9 1 6*1 52* 

1 1 1 


63 


23 


2 


4 


36 


27* 


490** 






hv nf THnh 


0) 




6 


TOT AT. AT 












.UMNT 






496 



















'Including those taking second bachelor's degree. 
**Deducting students graduating in two courses. 



80 Biennial Report, 191S-U 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses of instruction which are actually being taught in an 
institution at any given time afford one of the most important indica- 
tions of its value and rank educationally. 

The subjoined table gives (1) the several departments; (2) the catalog 
number and title of the various subjects being taught this semester; 
(3) the number of credit-hours per week in each; and (4) the number 
of students taking each subject. 

First Semester, 1914-15 — College. 

^^ ,,<.„ No. of 
Credits Students 

I. AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY: 

(No college courses given first semester, 19 14- 15.) 

II. AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING: 

2 Farm Surveying 2 5 

3 Farm Machinery and Farm Motors 2 2-3 8 

5 Farm Drainage 2 11 

III. AGRONOMY: 

1 Cereals . . 31-3 40 

3 General Farm Management 3 10 

2 Forage Crops 3 i 

7 Thesis 2 3 

9 Siminar i 3 

IV. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY: 

4 Breed Types of Live Stock 21-3 10 

8 Feeding Practice 2 8 

9 Advanced Live Stock Judging i 1-3 8 

X 5 Practicums 2-3 7 

1 7 Thesis i 7 

V. BACTERIOLOGY: 

3 Bacteriology for Home Economics 2 10 

9 Agricultural Bacteriology 3 28 

1 1 Soil Bacteriology 2 6 

VI. BOTANY: 

I General Botany 3 64 

3 Plant Physiology 3 8 

5 Systematic I'otany 3 9 

7 I'lant Anatomy 3 5 

9 Plant Pathology 2 4 

1 3 General Morphology 4 i 

VII. CHEMISTRY: 

I General Chemistry (3 sections) 4 104 

3 Qualitative Analysis 3-4 21 

5 Organic Chemistry 5 5 

5a Organic Chemistry 4 4 

7 Advanced Quantitative Analysis 3-4 4 

9 History of Chemical Theories i 2 

1 5 Thesis 3 i 

1 7 Chemistry of Foods 4 8 

VIII. CIVIL ENGINEERING: 

T JCnginr oring Drafting i 21 

1 3 J )escripti ve Geometry 2 26 

1 5 Surveying 4 ^7 

? J Testing I-ahoratory (2 sections) 2 6 

23 Graphic Statics 2 4 

2^ Railroad l-'.ngincering 4 3 

27 Roads and Pavements 2 3 

3 1 R< in forced Concrete 2 4 

33 Ro(,f Design 2 4 

37 Sewers and Sewerage 2 4 

4 1 Masonry and P'oundation 3 4 

43 Franicd Structures 4 4 



University of Idaho 



81 



Credits 

IX. DAIRY MANUFACTURES: 

5 Dairy Seminar i 

7 Advanced Butter Making 22-3 

9 Factory Management 3 

1 1 Thesis i 

1 3 ^lilk Technology 32-3 

X. DIARY PRODUCTION: 

I Dairy Farm Economics 3 

XI. ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE: 

I Elements of Economics 3 

3 Transportation 2 

5 Agricultural Economics 3. 

7 American Federal Government 3 

9 English Government 2 

Xir. EDUCATION: 

I Study Methods 2 

3 Principles of Teaching ^ 

5 History of Education 3 

7 Secondary Education 2 

1 1 Observation and Teaching 1-3 

XIII. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING: 

I Direct Current Mach. & Distribution 2 

I a Electrical Problems and Design 2 

3 Electrical Engineering Laboratory i 

5 Advanced Electrical Engineering 4 

7 Electrical Engineering Laboratory 2 

9 Hydro-Electric Plants - 2 

1 1 Telephony 2 

I la Telephony (for Forestry students) i 

1 3 Power Seminar 2 

XIV. ENGLISH: 

I Literature I,ectines 2 

I I Composition i 

I II Composition i 

I III Composition i 

I IV Composition i 

I V Composition i 

I VI Composition i 

I o I Literature Lectures 2 

203a-b Literature and Compositions 4 

1 1 Composition 2 

103 Composition 2 

5 Advanced Composition 3 

I I English Grammar and Composition for Teachers 2 

1 7 The English Novel 3 

19 English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century 2 

27 Shakespeare Seminar 3 

XV. FORESTRY: 

1 General Forestry 3 

3 Dendrology 3 

5 Forest Mensuration 3 

7 Forest Management 2 

9 Forest Engineering 3 

1 3 Forest Protection 3 

1 5 Timber Physics 3 

1 9 Forest Seminar 5^ 

26 Advanced Timber Physics 3 

29 Agriculture Forestry 2 

Wood By-Products 3 

XVI. GEOLOGY: 

I General Geology 3 

5 I'ractical Geology 3 

9 Economic Geology 2 

I I Petrology 2 



No. of 
Students 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



127 

28 

24 

20 

12 

24 

17 

55 

49 

24 

38 

9 

7 

6 

13 

4 



82 



Biennial Report, 1918-lU 



XVII. GERMAN: 

la Supplementary Cerman 

I Elementary (jcrman 

3 I Intermediate German 

3 II Intermediate German 

5 Schiller 

9 Modern Dramas 

1 1 Scientific German 

1 5 (Toethe 

17 History of German Literature 

23 Teachers' Course 

XVIII. GREEK: 

I Elementary Greek 

3 Xenophon 

XIX. HISTORY: 

I Early Middle Ages , 

3 The Renaissance 

7 English History 

1 I American Constitutional History 

1 5 Historical Method 

XX. HOME ECONOMICS: 

I Elementary Cookery , 

3 Advanced Cookery 

5 Dietetics , 

7 Cooking 

9 Methods of Teaching Home Economics . , 

loi I Elementary Sewing , 

101 II Elementary Sewing 

107 Costume and Design 

1 14 Intermediate Sewing 

201 House ^lanagement and Sanitation 

203 House Construction and IJecoration . . . , 

XXI. HORTICULTURE: 

3 Orchard and Garden Craft 

5 Practical Pomology 

7 Small Fruit Culture 

9 Seminar , 

I I Commercial Pomology 

1 3 Systematic Pomology 

XXII. LATIN: 

I Livy and \'^ergil 

I a Latin Prose Composition 

3 Horace 

3a Advanced Prose Composition 

8 Petronius 

XXIII. LAW: 

I History and System of the Common Law 

3 Contracts 1 

S Torts I 

7 Persons 

f) Property I 

2 1 I'roperty III 

2T, Negotiable Instruments 

25 I'artnership 

27 Evidence I 

29 Pleading \ 

4 1 Proi)erty \' 

43 Corporations 

47 Mining Law 

49 Drafting Legal Instruments 

5 1 Constitutional Law 

53 Practice I 

55 Medical Jurisprudence 

XXTV. FJF'.UARY SCIENCE: 

(Not giv«-n first semester, 1914-15.) 





No. of 




Students 


3 


9 


5 


20 


4 


17 


4 


36 


3 


23 


2 


16 


3 


8 


3 


7 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


5 


4 


3 


3 


37 


3 


27 


2 


16 


3 


21 


^ 


3 


3 


6 


3 


8 


3 


6 


2 


16 


4 


7 


2 


12 


2 


15 


2 


5 


2 


7 


3 


14 


2 


9 


3 


12 


2 2-3 


5 




2 




I 


I 2-3 


3 


I 2-3 


9 




U 




10 




7 




4 




S 




14 




13 




13 




12 




12 




19 




19 




15 




II 




II 




3 


2 


3 


2 


3 



University of Idaho 



83 



XXV. MATIIKMATICS : 
I College Algebra 

loi Engineering Mathematics 

103 Engineering Mathematics 

XXVI. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING: 
Machine Design: 

1 Mechanical Drawing 

5 Machine Design 

Shop Work: 

I I \Vood Working 

1 1 1 Wood Working 

3 Pattern Making 

5 Machine \V ork in Iron 

Sa Machine Shop Practice 

7 Advanced Machine Shop 

8 Advanced W'ood Working 

Mechanical Engineering: 

3 Practical Thermodynamics 3 

7 Refrigerating Machinery i 

9 Mechanical Laboratory i 

1 1 Steam Power Plants i 

1 7 Hydraulic Machinery 2 

KXVII. MILITARY SCIENCE; 

1 I Regulations 2 

I II Regulations 2 

3 Military Science 2 

SLXVIII. MINING AND METALLURGY: 

I Ore Dressing 2 

3 Metallurgy of Gold and Silver 2 

5 Earth and Rock Excavation 2 

7 Mining Methods 3 

9 Mining Economics 2 

1 3 Metallurgical Design 2 

1 9 Mine Plant Design 2 

2 1 Thesis 2 

KXIX. MUSIC: 
Piano — 

Individual Instrucetion 2-4 

Theory — 

I b Harmony 2 

I c Rudimental Music i 

3b Harmony 2 

History— 

5C History of Music 2 

Voice — 

Public School Music 2 

Individual Instruction i 

University Glee Club i 

Treble Clef Club i 

Violin- 
Individual Instruction i/^-i 

Orchestra i 

Quartet i 

XXX. PHILOSOPHY: 

I Psychology 3 

3 Ethics 3 

5 History of Philosophy 3 

7 Problems of Philosophy 2 

9 Ethics of the Bible 2 

XXXI. PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 
Men — 

I Introductory Course i 

3 Advanced Work i 

Women — 

la Freshman Gynasium i 

I b I Personal Hygiene i 

lb II Personal Hygiene i 



Credits 


No. of 
Students 


3 


15 


5 


24 


5 


17 


2 


10 


2 


3 




19 




14 




10 




5 




5 




2 




3 



70 
18 
40 



84 Biennial Report, 1913-lJ^ 



Credits 



No. of 
Students 



3a Sophomore Gynasium i 17 

3 3b Personal Hygiene i 26 

5 Playground Management 2 13 

7 I Folk and National Dancing i 15 

7 II Folk and National Dancing i 8 

XXXII. PHYSICS: 

I General Physics 4 6 

2 1 Home Economics Physics 3 3 

loi Engineering Physics 4 12 

103 Electricity and Magnetism 2 4 

105 Analytic Mechanics 3 4 

1 07 Electrical Measurements 2 4 

XXXIII. POULTRY: 

I Types and Breeds 22-3 5 

XXXIV. PUBLIC SPEAKING: 

I Reading ^ i^ 

7 Public Reading 2 7 

XXXV. ROMANCE LANGUAGES: 
French — 

I Elementary French S 25 

3 Intermediate French 4 18 

5 The Seventeenth Century 3 j 

Spanish — 

I Elementary Spanish 3 n 

3 Intermediate Spanish 3 3 

Italian — 

(Not given first semester, 1914-15.) 

XXXVL SOILS: 

3 Soil Analysis 21-3 6 

5 Origin and Classification of Soils £ 4 

XXXVII. VETERINARY SCIENCE: 

I Comparative Anatomy 3 48 

3 Materia Medica 2 7 

5 Sanitary Science i 3 

7 Animal Diseases 5 13 

XXXVIII. ZOOLOGY: 

I General Zoology 4 52 

3 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates S 11 

1 1 Advanced Entomology 2-4 2 

1 3 Vertebrate Histology and Organology 5 4 

1 7 Research 2-4 6 

SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE 

1. AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY: 

Agricultural Chemistry 4 8 

2. AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING: 

Farm Motors 4 22 

Farm Drainage 5 u 

Steam Engines 4 9 

Dairy Engineering 3 5 

3. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY: 

2nd Year Stock Juflging 4 16 

3rd Year Stock Judging 4 8 

Breeds and Judging 9 43 

Feeds and Feeding 3 11 

4. ARITHMETIC: 

Farm Arithmetic 5 4° 

5. T'.ACTERIOLOGY: 

Agricultural I'actcriology 3 22 

Dairy J'.acteriology 3 5 



University of Idaho 



85 



Credits 

BOTANY: 

Entomology 4 

Plant Life 6 

DAIRYING: 

Farm Dairying ■> 5 

ENGLISH: 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Second-Year English 3 

FORESTRY: 

Forestry 2 

, HORTICULTURE: 

Horticulture I 3 

Orcharding . . t 3 

. PHYSICS: 

Physics 4 

. POULTRY: 

Types and Breeds and Management 2 

SHOP: 

Forge Work I i 

Forge Work II i 

, VETERINARY SCIENCE:: 

Animal Diseases 3 

Veterinary Physiology 3 

SIX MONTHS DAIRY COURSE 

Butter Making 5 

Types and Breeds of Dairy Animals 2 

Dairy Calcvilations 2 

Milk Testing 5 

Dairy Practice 4 



No. of 
Students 



i6 



REPORT OF DEAN OF WOMEN 

Reports of the various college activities embodying the larger devel- 
opment of courses, increased class enrollment, better equipped labor- 
atories, and more efficient instruction are all vitally important and abso- 
lutely necessary to the existence of an institution. But that this institu- 
tion shall meet its real obligation to the State we must be able to report 
the development of normal well poised men and women, healthful in 
body and souL capable of efficient service and desirous of giving such 
service to their State. I feel I am justly able to report to you a sane, 
healthy, normal group of students, big in heart and souL who will make 
for the uplift and betterment of our State. 

It has been my constant effort to keep in close touch with our stud- 
ent body, and I have used the medium of social activities very largely 
to aid in this endeavor. My work here would not at all be worth while 
did I confine my interest to women students only. I have been enabled 
to reach the men much more definitely by being a part of their social 
mechanism and my opportunity for more delicate and more sympa- 
thetic direction has thus been greatly increased. 

It is my opinion that we are not doing all that we should in the 
matter of vocational training. I would say that we are limiting the 
possibilities of our women when as a matter of fact the possibilities 
in their own sphere are increasing. We are practically without oppor- 
tunity for artistic development which allows for so much in vocational 
enterprises. 



86 Biennial Report, WlS-lJf 



The work in Physical Education is seriously hampered by lack of a 
woman's Gymnasium, but more so from a lack of adequate instructors. 
The required needs of nearly 150 women are taken care of by one 
instructor; hence there is little chance for direction in playground 
work and for other phases of work having- vocational possibilities. 

Worthy of your consideration is the providing of a college nurse. 
We have no need that is greater in the institution unless it may be a 
college physician. 

That I may feel free to consider bringing to our young women occas- 
ionally a message from the outside world, also that I may take to the 
women of the State at times when they are representatively assem- 
bled some idea of our work and care of young women here, I am 
asking that a budget of $300 be allowed the office of Dean of Women. 

Appreciating fully the financial situation, I am respectfully submit- 
ting this report asking that you give what assistance you can for the 
further and more general development of our women. 

Very truly yours. 

PERMEAL FRENCH, 

Dean of Women. 

GIFTS 

Manifestly the needs of a growing institution outstrip the funds pro- 
vided by Federal and State revenue. This fact is generously appre- 
ciated by individuals who make donations and give endowment to 
state-supported institutions. 

The University of Idaho is glad to make acknowledgment of the 
following gifts: 

The library has received during the past biennium more than 2,000 
volumes, valued at $2,500. The principal donors to the library are Mrs. 
Mabel Price, Senator W. E. Borah, the Debate Council, numerous pub- 
lishing houses, educational and scientific institutions. 

For pictures given by students and instructor in History, valued 
at $105. 

The Forestry Department acknowledges gifts from numerous manu- 
facturing companies, amounting to $808. 

The Animal Husbandry and Dairying Departments of the College of 
Agriculture have received donations of animals and equipment during 
the past four years, amounting to $3,802. 

The Department of Mining Engineering has received models of 
mines, etc., amounting to $525. 

There have been miscellaneous gifts to the power plant and various 
departments aggregating $500. 

NEEDS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Estimating the income and expenses on a pro rata monthly basis 
for the biennium the University had a deficiency of about $10,000 
April 1, 1914. The excess of expenses over income pro rata per month 
for the biennium was about $500 per month on April 1. Had that con- 
dition continued the University would have closed its biennium 1913- 
1914 with a total deficit of about $15,000. The State Board of Education 



University of Idaho 87 



ordered immediate retrenchment and rigid economy. Hence the neces- 
sity to reduce the teaching and working staff of the institution, and 
also to curtail the purchases in every department during the remain- 
ing months of 1914. In addition to the deficiency handicap there was 
a further embarrassment due to the decrease in income from the land 
endowment during the year 1914. Nevertheless by reason of the 
economy practiced the University closes the biennium of 1913-1914 with 
no deficiency. It is, however, in serious need of additional instructors, 
and the department supplies on December 31 will approach the disap- 
pearing point. These points should be kept in mind when the appro- 
priations are considered. 

The reduction in staff is shown by these figures: 

Total Instructional Staff: 

University, 1913-14 82 

Agricultural Extension 13 

Total 95 

University, 1914-15 75 

Agricultural Extension 14 

Total 89 

It is urgently necessary that provision be made to fill up the vacant 
places on the staff. 

The needs of the institution are represented by legitimate requests 
for additional laboratories and recitation rooms at the University, pro- 
vision for meeting the depreciation of the University plant, required 
funds for supplies, increase in certain salaries, and for the employ of 
additional helpers within each of the six divisions of the University. 

A review of administration and general expenses and the cost of 
repairing and maintaining the buildings at the University during the 
past biennium indicates that there should be appropriated the follow- 
ing amounts during the coming biennium: 

Administration and general expenses $80,230 

Building and repairs and rnaintenance of grounds 35,000 

$115,230 

University and agricultural Extension 30,000 

Library 15,000 

Two summer schools 5,000 

Publications and advertising 5,000 

Improvements to lighting plant 4,000 

Railroad track to central heating plant 4,500 

Miscellaneous 5,000 

68,500 
For Experiment and Demonstration Farms: 

Aberdeen 5,000 

Gooding 5,000 



Biennial Report, 1913-lJi- 



Caldwell 5,000 

Sandpoint 5,000 

Sandpoint dairy herd 2,000 



22,000 
For co-operation with the various Bureaus and Divis- 
ions of the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture there should be appropriated the following 
amounts: 

Irrigation and orchard investigation 5,000 

Continuing important forestry investigation 5,000 

Investigation of insects injurious to Idaho crops 5,000 

Survey of soils 2,000 

Geological survey 2,000 

Markets and farm management 5,000 

Plant and animal survey 5,000 

29,000 

Total legislative appropriation required $234,730 

Considered on a basis of total income and total expense, the follow- 
ing estimate is given: 

ESTIMATED TOTAL EXPENSE, 1915-1916 

Salaries $290,230 

Administration and general expense: 

Salaries $15,000 

Sundry labor 4,500 

Freight and express 2,000 

Stationery and office supplies 1,500 

Bulletins, publications and printing 3,500 

Sundry supplies 5,000 

Travel expenses 3,500 

Commencement 500 

Fair exhibits 1,500 

Insurance 4,000 

Postage 1,500 

Fuel 17,500 

Water 3,000 

Light and power 4,500 

Telegraph and telephone 1,500 

Repairs and upkeep 11,000 80,000 

Departmental supplies 25,000 

Buildings and grounds 35,000 

University and Agricultural extension 30,000 

Library 15,000 

Summer school 5,000 

Publications and advertising 5,000 

Miscellaneous 5,000 

Improvements to lighting plant 4,000 

Railroad track to central heating plant 4,500 

Experiment and Demonstration Farms: 

Aberdeen 5,000 

Gooding 5,000 

Caldwell 5.000 



University of Idaho 89 



Sandpoint 5,000 

Sandpoint dairy herd 2,000 

Co-operative work: 

Continuing important forestry investigations 5,000 

Irrigation and orchard investigation 5,000 

Investigation of insects injurious to Idaho crops 5,000 

Survey of soils 2,000 

Geological survey 2,000 

Markets and farm management 5,000 

Plant and animal survey 5,000 51,000 



$549,730 



TOTAL ESTIMATED INCOME FOR 1915-1916 
Federal: 

Land endowment $135,000 

Morrill 100,000 

Hatch 30,000 

Adams 30,000 

Smith-Lever 20,000 



$315,000 



State appropriations requested to care for remaining 

expense of University during 1915-1916 234,730 

In the biennium 1913-14 the State appropriated for the University 
$219,900. The present request for $234,730 represents a yearly increase 
of less than 3% per cent, as against 10 per cent growth of the student 
body at the University. 

BUILDINGS 

In view of the present state of Idaho's finances, it would be improper 
to urge the question of new buildings tho they are actually needed and 
definite plans should be made for a modest and progressive building 
program at the University. At this time, the most urgent need is 
$100,000 bond issue with which to complete the south wing of the Ad- 
ministration building. 

Other buildings which should be includeed in the University building 
program in the next few years are: 

University commons and social center $150,000 

Forestry and engineering building 150,000 

Horticulture and Agronomy 100,000 

Agricultural engineering shops 25,000 

Stock barn, sheep, hogs and cattle 15,000 

These items are mentioned with the idea that the citizens of Idaho 
would prefer to plan an educational program extending thru a series of 
some years rather than follow a fragmentary, disconnected policy which 
leads to no definite goal. 

If the University of Idaho is to render the service which is due the 
citizens of the State, she must outline a policy which provides for a 
healthful growth, comparable with the development of the State. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 

FOR THE 

BIENNIAL PERIOD BEGINNING DEC. 1, 1912 
AND ENDING DEC. 1, 1914 



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•OO^COONOtxOtxOtN 


00 m « 

<-) !M 00 

0\ T? 


Oooomot^^lOO 
mo " ino r-s<*30 O 
^ o oo__ ■f^oo o_^ o__ o^ 

•^frtCroi-TfTroinTf 
0\ 11 c^ M 


• o o t^ -^ o <r)oo o\ o fo w \o 

•OOt1-OON-*«O00OO 

•00 ooo o o t^j^tnc^ooo^ 
; T? ■<? CO -^vo^ roinin ti 



t^ 0\ ^1 

00 ^x 
o 'O o\ 



t^ O -1 

O 00 t^ 
^1 PD "I 

00 moc 



VD O O 
VO O O 


OOOr^OOOOOOOOvO^inOMOO^O 
OOOi-OOOOOOOOinint^Ot^O\l^ 


to O O 
t^ O O 
00 O m 

rt N OO" 


000>nOOOOOOOOTj-0\0\OrOO\0 

oooooooooooo-*o\«ooorNO 
° °° ° ° °. "^ ° °° '^ "-l °, *^ '^^ ^'^ ^7 ° '^ " ^ 

ini-TroininTtrrTt-^-* invo O po >n in i-T n 



U-, o 

" o 


o 
o 


§ 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


» 


^ in o 
<n t^ o 


" 00 VO 
t^ Ov tN 


in o 
ro O 

00 o 


o 
o 
in 


o o 
o o 

O 00 


o 
o 
o 


o 

o 

o 


o 
o 

o 


o 

o 
o 


o o 
o o 

o 00 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 
o 


<o 


-t 


Oi O ro O \0 
- O 00 t^ o 
ro O vO " VO 


Tt IN 


00 




" 


m 


in 


m 


-t 


^1 


T^ 


^ 


^ 


in 


^ 


o 




<o in 


in « fj 



0) t^ 

u 0) 
Q 



o ^ o 
00 inm 

CO <ooo 



C^ 



■■^ "rt "2 



tu ." CJ lU 

s-d > > 

•or;: o o 

«o S u u. 






pq 






c 






'^^<^ 

3'^pq 



C-r P - 5 ?^ o 



H -.^ 



? c 

■c^ C 



•S''fl rt rt-^ c'^ >^ t: 
'xS__'^ '^CP-(«ja^o'o'o'o'o 



.5 rt rt rt ca 



bfl^";? rt o c.'^'r ^ 5 5 ^' o o 

; u p c; < ►-; t-.t- Ch c n d: K 51 



.-<-<" I 





■<*••-' fO ■<J- •t -^O 




iir 


N 11 O PO N (M VO 


• O 


H f) 







• OvOO 


coin IX 


« o\ o 




• fOOO 


CO moo 


TfvO txVO 


O 


Tj-O 0\ 


.\0 0\ Tt •* o 


tvVC VO 


ro c^ 


txOOO 


. I-H P» 


cooc 




Tt -tvO 




c^^»ovo 


• lOOO 


r^ 


\o 


■* O tr 






1-. N 
















. 00 fO 




o 


I-, CO 






N 



O Wi 






00 






CO « ^ ■* COOO tx O vo •* Tl- O 0\ 
COVO COOO cot>.coco<Ow »oo N 



t« o 

•r rt 



• tx 


M 


o o 


't o 


■* tx 


in 


HH 


o 


m 


• u> in 0\ O 


•n o 




(N 


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• o 




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in O 


tx 




o 






CO 


o \o 


t^ t-^ 0\ COOO 




o 


<N 


. ^^ 


0\ CO 


0\ tT Cn^ 


in 


(S 




CN 




















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•^ c^ w in moo 00 " * 00 Tt- 
ONcocoiin -^'-^i-i 

VO CO Tl- w M • tx 



::::::::::: :e : 

...' u , 

............ 'i . 

.:::::::::::%>: 

o . 

• ••• It- 

<y • 

c • 

c • 

o • 

::::::::::::«: 

en" . 

C . 

O 

■ '. : : ! V . ■ . : : "-M c 

*. • u ; -. : • == ° 

g : : : :2„§ • : : -^'^ 

o , bo be p ►_ __ (J a. c 

^„<j<j?^^C--:o--ocjcbc 
i2oocsoo:2rto^oOrti' 



^ c 
c « 

X O 



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(XI c 






College of Agriculture and 



Total 



Salaries 



Stenog. 

and 

Regular 

Employees 



Sundry 
Supplies 



Postage, 

Stationery 

and 

Office 

Supplies 



Freight 

and 
Express 



Chemical 

and 
Laboratory 
Supplies 



Agri. Chem, 
Agr. Eng. 
An. Husb. 
Racteriology 
Col. Farm 
Dairy .. 
Farm Crops 
Hort. .. , 
Prac. Agr, 
Poultry . 
Soils . . . 
Vet. Sci. 



$14, 
3, 

28, 

II, 
2, 

13, 
4. 

IS. 
3, 
3, 
6, 
2, 



586.67! $10,699.80 

648 

386, 



•551 
36I 
I4| 
35l 
6o| 
67I 
68 1 

,92| 

I3| 
48 1 
40I 



3,183.321, 

6,807.661 

9,780.311 

425-001. 
7,672.16] 
3,741-511 
9,250.111 
2,820.00] 
1,875-10], 
4,724-951 
2,225.09] , 

I 



|$I09, 



500 



95) $63,205.01] 



I 
$6o.oo| 

I 



7,368, 
132. 



490 

287 

1,249 



251 

ooj 

50] 



1 

S496.591 

37-82]. 

3,451-33] 

282.22] 

1,761.90] 

1,029.39] 

239-75I 

2,319-86] 

19-251 

389.78 1 

158-61] 

1 

I 



$i6.45l 



50.67] 

22.45] 
2.40] 

2.15! 

8.50] 
38.00] 
21-25] 
12.25] 
17-55! 
17.40] 
I 



1 
$464,261 

84-591 

1,147.46! 

128.88] 

2.3i|. 
100.95I 

27.42], 
229.70] 
6-571 . 
64-331 ■ 
162.66] 
5-42] 
I 



I 

$1,002,43] 

7.02I 

3-751 

533-231 

I 



51.221 



lO.OO] 



662.48 1 

I7I-39I 



I I I 

$9,662.91] $10,186.50] $209.07] 

I I I 



I I 

$2,424,551 $2,441,52] 

I I 



*See table on page 



Experiment Station — Expense* 



Bulletins 

and 
Publica- 
tions 


Sundry 
Supplies 


Traveling 
Expense 


Heat 


Light 

and 

Power 


Rent 

of 

Substat'n 


Feeding 
Stuffs 


Regigtra- 
tion 
Fees 


Advertis- 
ing 


^- 


$295-07 

45.80 

1,802.97 

173-20 

216.92 

707-05 

120.44 

1,398.73 

43.50 

276.04 

228.21 

20.85 


1 

$776.31 

1 


$189.52 


$45.49 


1 

1 










1 290.00 
1 ' 









239-85 


1,027.20 

1 


123.33 
59-35 






6,309-23 


54-25 




1 








, 1 




109.82 

3,008.60 

11.00 

263.88 






342.25 


237.45 

89.05 

163.85 

1 


62.63 


1 


13-50 




1 . . 




393-15 
314-85 


130.90 


1 






1 





6.50 


1 






452.63 






611.41 
1 96.25 

1 


1 79-61 























1 








$1,830.85 


$5,328,781 


1 

$3,001.52 
1 


$645,341 


1 
$45,491 $290.00 
1 


$10,155.16 


$67.76 


$6.50 



41 






. • OS • 




0\ 

l^ 

vd 


vq 

00 

«9- 


Bulletins 

and 
Puplica- 

tions 


is. CO • • • >0 . • 

: ; : I : ^^S : : : o\ : : 






1 


'. ''i ! .' ." 00 
. "^ . . . " 
. f^ . . . t^ 










OS 




tn o \r> • .i-o • • • m \r, • O 
O fO (v) . . n vo , . . t^ '1 . 


. • • • 
. . • • 

: 0. : : : 


00 

OC' 

'"I 


.-1 


n iM . . . <s r^ . . . lo tx • <r) O . ^- t . li^ 

lo t<. ; ; ; d ^^ ; ; ; 6\c6 ', 6. ^ [ ^i J^ ; d 

•to IDPO ^^J- Tt-0^^r^^ 


to 


Chemicals 

and 

Laboratory 

Supplies 


<soo • • • \r> a ■ . .o>. . 

6 t^ : : : 6 4 : : : 4 : : 
00O...VO ...>^.. 
"00 : . OS . . : 

09- ^ . . . 




• • -00 

• . 10 • fO 

■:\ilS 


CO 
CO 




ON • • •^^T^• • -oDro-MTi-.oOTi-'t^ 

6v« : : [6 4-'. '. :46M4ov:i^t^:«A 

ir^r^. . .0>iO. . .OQONtSC^I .MVO .CO 




PI 


lofO'" -CMi^* • -ino • moo • O o • O 
T)-t^*0 -ot^- • -OO -Plup-OO -00 

' in '. t^ '. >^ 00 '. '. ! "' vd ; CO M ; w 4 ! >-' 


CO 


|i 


,ol>»»««^>^'<tO • •Goto .vom -loio -ID 
d t^ •-' vd to o\ tx ; .'"44 '."So-^ ! to TJ- ! d\ 

vOO-^-OJ^.. OON. a.CO . * rl- . OS 
-0\ CO ..ro".^ .(^1 

v^ „' . . ... 


CO 

00 

CO 


'1 


o . • . . o 

lO . . . .in 
ts. ■ ■ ■ ■ t-s 

•^ :'.'.'. <>■ 

^^ . . . .CO 


. . .00 .0 
. . . . . >o 
• • ■ ■ d t-^ ■ <o 

: : . : so : o^ 


:ag : : 

■ so 00 ■ ■ 

so . ; 




00 


•c 

1 


N0"10 OO OOO 0»00\0 >000 OO OO 
►HOVOOOiOOOOOOiOO^OOOOOO 


so 




lod-d 6 ^ 6 6"^ 6 ^ ^ 6 6\6 6 "id 6 6 

>0 O 00 00 - 00 t^^ OOOi'l^iOOMO wiOiOfx 


•vO C^ M Tf O\00 rot^t-to iOtTM 0\t- 0\-*t1-«0 


c 


« « looo >noo "OO o <^ 0\0 o\t^o Ttfooio 
o\so o t^ N lo M q o Tj- q vq q N tJ- o M o\ q Is. 
Oil-" dsfotoTt-fodvd M 'i-4dcd^ o" r^d d i^ 

rO M ►< lO CI a CO ^ O 00 't t^ ><". OS c^ O 1^00 lO t^ 

00 ^i"^^ t i-sco '-^ "t '?co '-. '^' q> '^ <^ "i, OO ^ '~1 "L 

vOrOPrT}-Ov'Ocol^44cOvO-tfro.-d\4'<t4 


00 

4 

so 
sO_^ 




c J= ;i 73 c. ^0 ^ 


; • C ; • • 

« C ,/, 

• ■ — I • • 


'. 







I 



I 

1 



Suisi^ 
-aaApv 








i 


1 








00 
VO 


II 


5^ 


00 

IN 


to 


11 


„ t^ roC30 


Bulletins 

and 
Publica- 
tions 












Chemical 

and 

Laboratory 

Supplies 






OS 




it 

2H 


^ 0\ OMO 

ON w 0\ "^ 

tS M ^4 f> 
09- 


00 

1^ 

o 
o 


Postage, 

Station'y 

and 

Office 

Supplies 






o 


o 




00 -1 m !N 

^ 00 ^ N 

00 o a ON 
■* CO Tj- r^ 


00 


CO 


0\ O ^/^ " 
O\00 <M fO 

0\ O t^ fC 
M CO O 1^ 
^0 O\00 0\ 

d; fo^ooo" 




Total 


■* 1^ 0\ '^ 
N T)- CS 0\ 

r^ fo ■* o\ 

O \0 tN-vO 
O ■<? 00 o 


0\ 
to 




. t 

Ml £ 

'0^ 


4> 


i3 


i 





I 

I 
i 






College of Agriculture and Experiment Station— Equipment* 



Agri. Chemistry . 
Agr. Engineering 
An. Husbandry 
Bacteriology . . . 
College Farm . . 

Dairy 

Farm Crops . . . . 
Horticulture . . 
Practical Agr. . . 

Poultry 

Soils 

Veterinary Sci. . 




Tools. Scientific j Furn. 
Imp. I Appara- and 
Mach. tus Fix. 



Books 
Live I and 
Stock Period- 
icals 



Other 
Eqip- 
ment 



$416,501 

431.78) 

9,068.921 

1, 545-581 

427.11 1 

2,820.91 1 

96.93I 

666.351 

47-891 ■ 
S35-22| 
877-I1I 
201. 5o| 



I 
$i7.oo| 
90.32I 
801.83I 
19.19I 
258.36I. 
112.63I 

19-351- 
472-25I 

I 

6-931- 
13-40I 
100. oo| . 
I 



I I 

$256.25! $25.98! 

206.55I 127.7SJ 

18.1SI 308. oo| 7,282.50 
1,288.221 iiS.ooj 9.00 



I 
!$I07. 

I 5. 
I 98. 

I I. 
I .... 



25-80I 



160. 45| 
-27-39I 

1 

700. 76I 

I 



1.35I 2,600.00 
'O-50I 



37 



$9.60 

2.07 

559-57 

109.93 

168.75 

81.13 

30.00 

iS-65 



20.50I 

47.00I 17.00 

■20.75! 

1 



1 ?■ 

I 27. 

I 28 
I 



00 1 
751 
ooj 



457-29 
14-45 
73-50 



I I I I I I I 

|$i7,i35.8o|$i,9ii.26|$2,683.57|$779.83|$9,9o8.5o!$330.70l$i,S2i.94 

I I I I I I I 



'See table on pages 94-9S. 



College of Letters and Science — Equipment* 



Total 



Tools, 
Impl. 
Mach. 



Scientific 
Appara- 
tus 



Furn. 
and 
Fix. 



Live 
Stock 



Booted 
and 

Period- 
icals 



Other 
Equip- 
ment 



CoUec- 



Botany . . . | $i 
Chemistry . . [ i 
Economics . | . . 
English . . . . 1 
Forestry . . | i 
Geology . . . | 
Greek & Latin | 
History . . . | 
Home Econ. . | 2 
Library . . . | 8 
Military . . . | 

Music I 

Phys. Edu. . I 
Physics . . . I 
Rom. Lang. . | 
Zool. & Ent. I 



I I 

,435-oo| I$i,i40. 

,712.941 104.31 1 814- 



4o| $244,501. 
30I' 275-351 ■ 



21.10I I 

.287.82I 113.79I 288. 

663. 87I 100.49I 103. 

2.62I I 

I4-S5I i 

,304.101 77-99i 32. 

.078.03I I 

230.83I I 

348.22I I 

846.96I 64.53I 341. 
906.89I 309-031 440. 

26.91 1 I 

567.12I 7.50] 132. 
I I 



6i| 513-86I 
24i 83.70I 



4-551 ■ 
35| 1,147.571. 
..| 1,820.511. 

••I 



1 294-85 1 . 

63I 237.75I, 

41I 32. 95|' 

!• 



53l 130.00I. 
I I 



$5-95 



2.62 



23-65 
6,246.52 



$12,951 $31.20 

518.98I 

I 



369-561 

57-90! 318-54 
I 



1,022.541 

11.00] 

230.83I 

53-371 

203. 05I 

124.50I 

26-91I 

91-791 205.30 



I I I ! I 

|$i8,446.961$777-64|$3,293-47l$4»8i6.69|. 
I I I I I 



$6,280.74 



I 
$2,723.38|$S55.04 

I 



*See table on page 96. 



College of Engineering — Equipment 



Total 



Tools, 
Imp. 
Mach. 



Scientific 


Fum. 


Appara- 


and 


tus 


Fix. 



Books I 
and I 

Period- 
icals I 



Other 

EJquip- 
ment 



ICollec- 
I tions 



Civil Eng. . 
Elect. Eng. 
Mech. Eng. 
Mng. & Met. 



I I I I I 

$1,269.56 i $196.94 |$^oi.25 |$76s.27 I $8.55 I $97-55 

997.82 I 890.44 I 29.38 I 1 I 78.00 

1,789.73 I 1,661.34 I I 95.78 1 I 32.61 

1,429.47 I 658.33 I 731.47 I 27.17 I I 7.25 

I I I I I 



I S.35 



I I I 

$5,486.58 |$3,407.05 |$962.io | 



I I I 

.22 I $8.55 I $215.41 1 $5-25 
I I I 



College of Law— Equipment 



Law 



I I I I I I 

I 995.63 I I I 50.00 I945. 63 j. 

I I I I I I 



Summary of Expenditures -Dec. 1. 1912 to Dec. 1, 19U 



Colleere and Department 



Expense Equipment 



Totals 



Letters iiiui Sciences: . 

Botany , 

Chemistry , 

Kcononiics , 

Education 

English 

Forestry 

Geology 

German 

Greek & Latin 

History 

Home Economics . . . . 

Library 

Mathematics 

Military 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physical Education . . , . 

Physics 

Rom. Languages 

Zoology & Entomology . . 
College of Agriculture: 

Agri. Chemistry 

Agr. Engineering . . . . 
Animal Husbandry . . . , 

Bacteriology 

College Farm 

Dairy 

Farm Crops 

Horticulture 

Practical Agri 

Poultry 

Soils 

Veterinary 

College of Engineering: 
Civil Engineering . . . . 
Electrical Engineering . . 
Mechanical Engineering . . 

Mining & Met 

College of Laws: 

Law 

Summer Session: , . . 

Svimmer School , 

Agricultural Extension: 

Agri. Ext., General 

Aberdeen Station , 

Caldwell Station 

Clagstone Station 

Gooding Station 

Sandpoint Station . . . . . , 

Jerome Station 

Pure Seed Inspection . . . 

Alfalfa Weevil Inv 

Irrigation Inv 

Hog Cholera Plant 

Administration: 

President's Office 

Bursar's Office 

Dean's Office 

Dean of Women 

Director's Office 



$6,839. 
i3,2ii. 

2,6/9 

4,453. 

9,7-'5. 
13,894- 

3,783. 

7,460. 

4,306. 

4,881. 
13,144. 

6,574- 

4,950. 

2,698. 

9,936. 

1,100. 

9,877. 

4,680. 

4,250. 

4,277. 



$1,435.00 I 
1,712.94 I 





21 .10 

1,287.82 

663.87 




2 
14 

f'3°^ 
8,078 


62 

55 
10 
03 


230 
348 


83 

22 
...1 



14,586. 

3,648- 

28,386. 

11,112. 
2,518 

13,717 
4,524 

15,447 
3,231 
3,070 
6,720 
2,536 



846.96 

906.89 

26.91 

567.12 



$8,274.91 

14,924.55 
2,619.05 
4,453-78 
9.746.35 

15,182.40 
4,447.08 
7,460.00 
4,308.62 
4,895.95 

15,448.12 

14,652.72 
4,950.00 
2,929. 12 

10,284.69 
1,100.00 

10,724.20 
5,587.82 
4,276.91 
4,844,87 



Grand 
Totals 



$151 



67 I 
55 I 
36 I 
14 I 



10,077 
4,663 
8,744 

10,679 



.24 I 
.47 I 
29 I 
94 I 



416.50 

431.78 

9,068.92 

1,545.58 

427.11 

2,820.91 

96.93 

666.35 

47-89 

535-22 

877-11 

201.50 I 

I 



15,003.17 

4,080.33 

37,455-28 

12,657.72 

2,945.46 

16,538.51 
4,621 .60 

16,114.03 
3,279.81 
3,605.35 
7,597.59 
2,737.90 



1,269.56 
997.82 

1,789-73 
1,429.47 



11,346.80 

5,661 .29 

10,534.02 

12,109.41 



$126,636.75 



$39,651.52 



I 15,110.17 I 995.63 I 16,105.80 I 
I I 



i $16,105.80 



1,753.31 



24,702.94 

4,735-77 
6,606. 14 
3,176.34 I 
4,642.81 
125.11 
3,749 -60 
6,861.08 
3,753-97 
3,800.45 
12,893.98 



191 .90 
967-49 
365.20 
885.85 
527.83 

5,942.15 

75-94 

251-95 

93-14 

203.90 

1,197-53 



Overhead and Operation: 



7,908.56 I 
9,667.34 I 
3,328.65 
3,804.50 
10,616. 18 

72,613.05 



Buildings and Additions to Land, 
I'>ldgs., & Equip 



138.00 

90.15 

194.73 

108.86 



86,104.54 



1,753-31 



24,894.84 
5,703.26 
6,971.34 
4,062.19 
5,170.64 
6,067,26 
3.825.54 
7.113-03 
3,847.11 
4,004.35 

14,091.51 



$1,753-31 
$85,751.07 



$35,856.97 



7,908.56 
9.805.34 
3.418.80 
3,999-23 
10,725.04 

72,613.05 I $72,613.05 

86,104.54 ! $86,104.54 
I 



$615,584. 



t5 |$6i5,584-i5 



Agricultural Extension 



Total 



Salaries 



Stenog. 

and 

Regular 

£mp. 



Sundry 
Labor 



Station'y 

and 

Office 

Supplies 



Freight 

and 
Express 



Agr. Extension General Acct. . 

Aberdeen Station 

Caldwell Station 

Clagstone Station 

Gooding Station 

Jerome Station 

Sandpoint Station 

Pure Seed Inspection 

Alfalfa \\'eevil Inv 

Irrigation Inv 

Hog Cholera Plant 



I 
$24,702,941 

4,735-771 

6,606.141 

3,176.341 

4,642.81! 

125.11I 

3,749-6ol 

6,861.081 

3,753-971 

3,800.451 

12,893.981 

I 



I 
$10,441-42 1 
I 

2,50O.OO| 

1,150.001 
2,191.661 

I 



I 

$i,379.oo| 

1,586.251 

i,36i.2o| 

561. 50| 

316.00I 



I 

$244,671 

1,037.461 

971. loj 

586.54I 

202. 751 



312.50I 
2,858.92! 
2,638.351 
2,552.451 
1,550.691 
I 



$448,011 $51.04 

3.70I 94.64 

4.00I 36.98 

I 

59.80I 57.63 

I 



993-9o| 

I 



III. 65! 
S17.80I 



2,111.731 

368.53I 

1.40I 

51-35I 

1,287.84! 

I 



187-351 

9-751 

2-50I 

51.22I 



14.50 

5-29 

3-75 

II. II 

163.79 



I I 

I $75,048.19! 

I I 



I 

$26,195.99! 

I 



$6,827.30! $6,863,371 
I I 



$766,331 $438.73 

I 



Expense 



Bulle- 
tins 
and 

PubU- 
cations 



Sundry 
Supplies 



Travel 
Expense 



Post- 
age 



Land 
Rentals 



Teleph. 

and 
Telegh . 



Feeding 
Stuffs 



Heat, 

Light. 
Power 

and 
Water 



Repairs 



Insur- 
ance 



$448.00 



29.60 
144.00 



98.00 



$357-481 

i,lii.34| 

565.361 

440.97 

554.55 

3450 

1,135-50 

III-5S 

10.00 

139-73 

7.552.94 



; 0,939. 15 

403.65 
54.60 

327-53 

308.15 

7.80 

79.77 

2,192.66 

946.72 1 

920. 92I 

606. oo| 



$53.00 



40.88 



I I ' I 

$65.00] $276.17]. 

I 8.92] 

I 44.65] 

I I 

I 25.92] 

I 2.36] 

I 4-92] 

I 72.40I 

I I 



1 

182.09] 
578.80] 

79-22 



120.77 
189.78 



90.68 



I -541 

] 28.44] 1,012.81 

I I 



164.20 



10.20 
24-45 



186.95 

276.05 

30.58 

704.15 



23.62 

58.00 
80.45 



$719.60 



$12,013. 92r $16,786.95! $93. 



$65.00] $464.32) $1,943.60 
I I 



$509-40 



$1,197-73] ?i62.07 
1 



Agricultural Extension Equipment 



Total 



SS 



y=5 

C »H 



3 P 

fa 



as 

O 



Agr. Ex. Gen. Act 
Aberdeen Sta. . 
Caldwell Sta. . 
Clagstone Sta. . 
Gooding Sta. . 
Jerome Sta. . . 
Sandpoint Sta. . . 
Pure Seed Insp. . 
Alf. Weevil Inv. . 
Irrigation Inv. . 
Hog Cholera Plant 



$191.90 
967.49 1 
365.20] 
885.85I 
527-831 

5,942.iS| 

75-941 

251 95i 

93-141 

203. 9o| 

I, 197-531 



$1.90 $10.00 
611. 17I 
365-20! 
230.8s I 
137-93I 



61.42I 

206. 4o| 

70.20I 

50.40J 152.75 
9.26I 44-27 
I 



I I 

$100.00 |$5.oo 



I 655-00I. 

2I.8S| 2I0.00|, 



22.30I I 1.25 

I I 



•751 1. 

...| 22.S5I. 
I I 



I 
$75.oo|, 



I 356.32 
■\ 



158.0SI 

I 5,942.15 

14-52I 

22.00| 

22.94I 



21-971 1,099.48 

I 



I I I I I 

$10,702.88] $1,744-73 1 $207.02] $144,901 $887.55 1 $6.25 

I I I I I 



$3i4-48]$7, 397-95 
I 



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Tf- IT) ■* t^ 'T 

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o^- 



Administration — Equipment 



Total 



^Furniture 

and 

Fixtures 



Books and 
Periodicals 



Other 
Equipment 



Bursar's Office 

Dean's Office 


$138.00 
90.15 
194-73 1 
108.86 1 

1 


$125.05 1 
89-35 1- 
161.52 1. 
90.60 1 

1 


$1-75 


$11.20 
80 






33-21 
12.25 


Director's Office 


6.01 




$531-74 
1 


$466.52 
1 


$7-76 


$57.46 



ft 5"^ 



'I 






i.t 









2§ 
So 



■+00 'O ro 



00O\-i<^roOT}-O-tO I^^ 



- -t^lOO 0\^l <»^^i O^ ^(30 ^C^O int^io^vo -^t 






1) </> 



OS -a 



• y (iH 




,-rH« 



Additions to Land, Buildings and Equipment 



New Heating Tunnel | $14,450.00 | 



Grading Grounds 

New Scales 

New Sidewalks 

New Maple floor in Gymnasium 
Furnishings for Auditorium . . 
Miscellaneous 



6,128.72 
213-95 I 

1,271 .20 
995-00 

2,544-15 

4,938.07 



$30,541.09 



New Buildings 



Completion of North Wing 



1 

I 55,563-45 

I 

I $86,104.54 



'O . / r ->- 



3 0112 105628983